Red Cross – Preparedness Month – Pet Safety

by guest blogger:  Bandit the Prepared Pug

Bandit the Prepared Pug – Knows a Safe Place to Take Pets

IMAG0255-1-1Did you know if there was a disaster, I would not be allowed in a disaster shelter, even with this cute mug? If my mom and dad needed to find a place for us to stay in case of a disaster, they might not be able to find a hotel or motel that allows me. Luckily, my mom did her homework and found a listing of “pet friendly” hotels and motels after confirming if they had any restrictions on the number of “petite” pugs.

My mom also made a list of people that could take me in case something happens in Green Bay and the surrounding area. It includes friends, family and boarding facilities that can shelter me if an emergency happens.

She loves me so much, she laminated it.

FYI: Service animals are allowed in Red Cross shelters and in hotels and motels.

Bandit the Prepared Pug – Assembles a Pet Emergency Preparedness Kit

  • I am ready for any emergency!
  • I have my own bag with my name on it that has everything in my very own preparedness kit:
  • A copy of my veterinarian and HomeAgain (microchip) information
  • An extra leash and color
  • A small supply of food and treats
  • A current photo of me in case she has to ask if anyone has seen a super cute pug
  • My favorite treats and “Come here” saying, in case I decide to run on someone (FYI, I love to brush my teeth)

The one thing she needs to add is a first aid kit for me in case I would get injured, but she should probably take First Aid for Pets course offered through the Red Cross first.

IMG_20130911_175838Bandit the Prepared Pug – Helps Emergency Workers Help Pets

Sometimes I sleep in my kennel in the laundry away from my mom and dad. If a disaster would happen and my mom wasn’t able to get to me, people need to know where I am!

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (commonly known as the ASPCA) offers my mom and all other pet owners a free window decal alerting rescue personnel where a pet might be in a house. She visited https://www.aspca.org/form/free-pet-safety-pack to sign up for her free decal.

She’s always looking out for me. Best mom ever.

American Red Cross “Dancing” Fundraiser to Announce 2014 Event Participants at October 1 Kickoff Party

197043_978x288_RevAnother cast of local celebrities is assembling to participate in Dancing with Our Stars 2014 for the American Red Cross of Northeast Wisconsin, presented by the Schneider National Foundation.  The star dancers will compete to raise the most money and take home the coveted Fundraising Mirror Ball Trophy.  This year’s dancers will be revealed during a private kickoff party Tuesday, October 1st.  Presented by Festival Foods, the kickoff party will be held at The Marq on French Road in De Pere.

“This event continues to grow and create a buzz in the community,” says Chapter Executive Steve Hansen.  “The star dancers do a tremendous job not only on the dance floor but more importantly raising funds to help support local Red Cross efforts.”

Betina Driver, and her husband and dancer partner Donald Driver, showing off their matching mirrorball trophies.

Betina Driver, and her husband and dancer partner Donald Driver, showing off their matching mirrorball trophies.

Dancing with Our Stars is now in its sixth year and it is has been a sold-out event each year.  Not only do those in attendance support local efforts, so can those not attending as the star dancers receive votes in the form of donations to the Red Cross.  One dollar equals one vote.  All funds raised support disaster prevention, preparation and relief, the life-saving training of first aid, CPR/AED classes, collection and testing of blood and blood products, support to military members serving around the globe, the transportation program and international programs.

Last year’s event raised nearly $370,000 for the local Red Cross.  Betina Driver, wife of former Green Bay Packers wide receiver Donald Driver, took home the Fundraising Mirror Ball Trophy after raising $158,000.

Dancing with our Stars 2014 will take place Saturday, February 15th at the KI Convention Center in downtown Green Bay. Information about tickets will be available at a later date. More event information can be found on the following Red Cross platforms:

Website: http://redcross.org/newisconsin

Dancing with our Stars blog: http://redcrossdwosblog.org

Facebook: http://facebook.com/NEWRedCross

Twitter: @NEWRedCross (#DWOS to join the conversation!)

The Schneider National Foundation, Arketype, Associated Bank, Bay Industries, Festival Foods, Green Bay Packaging, Inc., Green Bay Packers,  Jack’s Maintenance, WBAY-TV, WIXX and the Green Bay Press-Gazette are proud sponsors of Dancing with our Stars 2014.

Take the pledge

As we’ve seen over the past few months with wildfires, floods and other emergencies, disasters can strike anywhere and at any time. This September we’re on a mission. We want you and every American to be prepared with an emergency game plan.

We’re starting with you. Take the first, easy step: pledge to be prepared for the next emergency by September 30. You have a couple days left!!!

CAM0061 pledge prepare

By signing our pledge, you’ll join a community of thousands of other Americans who are ready no matter what comes their way.

And, after signing our pledge, you’ll be able to make an emergency game plan for you and your family, sign up for a course and create an emergency checklist or kit.

Don’t wait – pledge to be prepared today.

Whether it’s a hurricane, a flood, or a house fire that threatens, it pays to plan ahead.

Sincerely,


Gail McGovern
President and CEO, American Red Cross

20th Anniversary of Soup’s ON – Help Support High School Challenge

Soup's-On-FY14

Ten area high schools and their partner restaurants are well on their way to creating a delicious soup for you to try at the 20th Annual Soup’s On fundraiser to benefit the American Red Cross. You won’t go away hungry! You’ll be spoiled with endless soup tasting, fresh grilled cheese sandwiches from Simon’s Cheese, and a variety of appetizers and desserts.

This year, the event team wanted to “spice” things up a bit to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the event.

“For the past 19 years, we have invited restaurants to serve their own soup creations at Soup’s On. With so many team fundraisers out there now, and with popular shows like Celebrity Chef, we wanted to give it a try and create fun teams. We ultimately decided it would be neat to engage the youth in the event. They would get to work with a professional chef, learn more about the Red Cross and give back to their community,” said Becky Bergin, Director of Special Events for the Eastern Wisconsin Region.

But there’s more to the Soup’s On – High School Challenge than great soups! The participating high schools will also be campaigning for your votes prior to the event in an effort to be awarded the Crème de la Crème fundraising trophy and $1,000 grant to use towards new cooking equipment in the classroom. One vote = one dollar.

The list of high school and restaurant teams are as follows:

Appleton East High/Café Bon Appetit

Appleton North High/Mark’s Eastside

Appleton West High/Grand Meridian

Fox Valley Lutheran High/Pullman’s at Trolley Square

Green Bay Preble High/Big Tomatoes

Hortonville High/Ione’s Dining Room (FVTC)

Little Chute High/Main Event Steakhouse

Kaukauna High/Kangaroost

Neenah High/Cannova’s Pizzeria

St. Francis Xavier High/Atlas Coffee Mill & Café

You can show your support for one or more of these teams by placing your vote today at: http://www.crowdrise.com/northeasternwisconsinsoupson

The event will be held on Friday, November 1, 2013 at the Grand Meridian, 2621 N. Oneida St., Appleton. Tickets are on sale now and are $45 in advance and $50 at the door. 

Thank You to Walmart for Their Support of Disaster Relief

Walmart Mutual St. 2

When Northeast Wisconsin was impacted by SIX tornadoes and straight line winds in August, friends, neighbors and local organizations jumped in to help those in need.  The Walmart store (#1982) in Appleton on Mutual Way is still helping.

Michael Queen, Shift Manager, presented Betsy Wandtke, Major Gifts Officer, with a check for $1,000 for Disaster Relief.  The presentation was made during the store’s grand opening after the major remodeling project.  The event was attended by other store managers, employees and organizations also getting support for their causes.  It was an energetic and uplifting meeting.

We want to thank Walmart for their support of the community not only during the disaster, but after as well.  We couldn’t do what we do without their help!

Colorado Floods – Telling our Story: Part 1

By Jody Weyers, Volunteer and Communications Director

How do I even start to share about this amazing journey I have been on for the past week? I will start from the beginning. I landed in Denver, Colorado, Sunday, Sept 15 around 12:30 pm.  I pick up my rental car and called Hector Emanuel, the photographer, I would be paired with for the next week, to see where he was at.

Ran into many detours on my way to Greely, Colorado.

Ran into many detours on my way to Greely, Colorado.

He, and his assistant Liz Preovolos, were at a Red Cross shelter in Greely, Colorado. I looked at my gps, and it was about an hour drive. Upon my arrival in Denver, it was a very gray, rainy and cold day. I headed off to Greely, and as I got closer, it was harder and harder to get there. I stop at a local gas station 10 miles from Greely, and ask how to get there.  With roads washed out, and/or flooded, it was almost impossible. The store clerk, providing me some alternative routes, and thanked me for my work. I had on my Red Cross hat and sweatshirt, and I am once again reminded of the power of the Red Cross symbol. The clerk, comes out from behind the counter, and asks “Can I give you a hug?” Of course, I say yes.

I finally make it to the City of Greely Recreation Center, after many detours. I go inside and there is a flurry of activity. I meet up with Hector and Liz, who arrived the day before, and have spent most of the day at the shelter. They give me a tour of the facility, I talked with some of the volunteers, and clients, and then we head back to our home base in Loveland, Colorado for the night.

This would be the start of our routine for the week. Hector, would go to his room to look at his pictures from the day, and pick the best 25-30 photos to send to American Red Cross National Headquarters. The three of us would meet in the hotel lounge, and we would go over photo release forms, identify the people in each picture, and write the caption for each photo to share their story.

Why are we doing this you ask? These photos and stories paint a picture of how the American Red Cross is assisting the people of Colorado. We are bringing a face to the American people, so when people donate, they know who and how they are helping. We are telling our story!

Monday, September 16 –

The three of us meet down in the hotel lounge for breakfast and we make our game plan for the day. We focus on the Red Cross shelters that are set up to house the many people displaced. Sunday night there was 1,000 people that stayed in 24 different shelters across Colorado.

First Stop, Thompson School District Building, in Loveland, Colorado.  We met a family who had not one, not two, but three disasters displace them from their homes, over the past six months. The Oft family moved from Sallisaw, Oklahoma, after two tornadoes ripped through their town and damaged their home. They moved to Drake, CO to be closer to family. They barely had enough time to evacuate as the flood waters started  rise over the roads. Charlsey Oft said, “When you have kids, you can’t think of the bad stuff, you have to carry on and we are thankful for the goodness of others.”

Monday, September 16, 2013. Red Cross Shelter at Thompson School, Loveland, CO. Red Cross Health Services worker Pam Robinson, RN, of Masonville, Colorado, hugs Adalynn Oft, 4, of Drake, Colorado, as her sister, Zoee, 1, looks on and her mother Charlsey, share their story.  Photo by Hector Emanuel/American Red Cross

Monday, September 16, 2013. Red Cross Shelter at Thompson School District Building, Loveland, CO. Red Cross Health Services worker Pam Robinson, RN, of Masonville, Colorado, hugs Adalynn Oft, 4, of Drake, Colorado, as her sister, Zoee, 1, looks on and her mother Charlsey, shares their story. Photo by Hector Emanuel/American Red Cross

The second shelter we visited was Niwot High School, in Niwot, Colorado. The people at this shelter were airlifted to safety because of the roads being washed out and they were not able to get out by vehicle.  This is were we met Donna Hitz, 81 from Lyons, Colorado.  She had such a good spirit and attitude.  I was cracking up laughing because she was telling me about how handsome the pilots were in their uniform, and she would do it all over again for a ride with them.

Monday, September 16, 2013. Red Cross shelter at Niwot High School, Niwot, Colorado. Donna Hitz, 81, of Lyons, Colorado, shares with Red Cross worker Jody Weyers of Green Bay, Wisconsin, her experience of being airlifted by a helicopter from her property to safety. Her neighbors knocked on her door to alert her to the evacuation and the next thing she knew, a helicopter was landing in her pasture. Photo by Hector Emanuel/American Red Cross

Monday, September 16, 2013. Red Cross shelter at Niwot High School, Niwot, Colorado. Donna Hitz, 81, of Lyons, Colorado, shares with Red Cross worker Jody Weyers of Green Bay, Wisconsin, her experience of being airlifted by a helicopter from her property to safety. Her neighbors knocked on her door to alert her to the evacuation and the next thing she knew, a helicopter was landing in her pasture. Photo by Hector Emanuel/American Red Cross

The third shelter we went to was the YMCA of Boulder Valley, in Boulder, Colorado.  There was a lot of activity at this shelter, because business did not shut down for the YMCA, so you had their customers coming to workout, among all the people displaced. This is were we met Esther Peter, who had such a beautiful soul and strength about her. She and her five sisters, brother and mom, evacuated to the Boulder shelter, after water started running into their apartment building. They were able to grab a few items, important documents and that was it. Originally from South Sudan, they moved to Kenya. After enduring a lifetime of hardships in a country engaged in armed conflict, she came to the United States to build a better life with her family. Esther had to leave her two young daughters with family in Kenya, with hopes to reunite in Boulder as soon as possible.

Monday, September 16, 2013. Red Cross shelter at the YMCA, Boulder, Colorado. Esther Peter, of Boulder, Colorado, shares her heroic story with Dr. Kathy Palakow, Psy.D., LPC, Red Cross Mental Health Worker of Boulder, CO. Photo by Hector Emanuel/American Red Cross

Monday, September 16, 2013. Red Cross shelter at the YMCA, Boulder, Colorado. Esther Peter, of Boulder, Colorado, shares her heroic story with Dr. Kathy Palakow, Psy.D., LPC, Red Cross Mental Health Worker of Boulder, CO. Photo by Hector Emanuel/American Red Cross

Our final shelter of the day we visited was Mead High School, in Longmont, Colorado. Hector and Liz were here the day before, and talked with many families, and we wanted to go back to see how some of them were doing. At this point in the disaster operation, some of these families have been in a shelter for 4-5 days and wanted to go home, but some didn’t have a home to go back to. To create some normalcy for the children, some of the volunteers took the children outside on the football field to play with balls, run around, and just be kids! It was great to hear their laughter, and for one small moment, they were able to forget about everything going on around them.

Monday, September 16, 2013. Red Cross shelter at Mead High School, Mead, CO. Red Cross Shelter Manager, Ruth “Max” Bourke, of Ault, Colorado, plays catch with JoAnn Hammond, 5, of Del Camino, Colorado. Photo by Hector Emanuel/American Red Cross

Monday, September 16, 2013. Red Cross shelter at Mead High School, Longmont, Colorado. Red Cross Shelter Manager, Ruth “Max” Bourke, of Ault, Colorado, plays catch with JoAnn Hammond, 5, of Del Camino, Colorado. Photo by Hector Emanuel/American Red Cross

Tuesday, September 17

Red Cross Northern Operations Headquarters at The Ranch-Larimer County Fairgrounds, Loveland, Colorado.

Red Cross Northern Operations Headquarters at The Ranch-Larimer County Fairgrounds, Loveland, Colorado.

We checked in at the Northern Operation Headquarters, at the Larimer County Fairgrounds, in Loveland, Colorado.  We talked with Mike Cooper, who was in charge of the Emergency Response Vehicles (ERV’s) and the workers who drove the vehicles and where they went each day.  We teamed up with ERV Drivers, Dennis and Dustin, both from Kansas. Their job was to “search and serve” in some of the hard hit areas in Northern Colorado.

We followed behind the ERV in our vehicle, as they went up and down roads and stopping occasionally to see if people needed help. We came across this road closure in Evans, Colorado and discovered, five or six guys trying to clean up their property from the floods. They were blocked in because one way the road was still flooded, and the other end of their road was barricaded.  Dustin and Dennis stopped the ERV, and we provided these families, with cleanup kits (including bleach, gloves, mop, broom, and bucket), hygiene kits(including basic toiletry items), tarps, shovels, and garbage bags. The flood waters rushed into their home, and like so many others, it came in so fast, they barely had time to evacuate. We also let them know that they could get a hot meal, shower, and other needed items at the City of Greely Recreation Center. It felt great to be able to help these people, and provide resources to them, because they felt like they were all alone blocked in on their road.

Tuesday, September 17, 2013. 49th St. in Evans, Colorado. American Red Cross emergency response drivers, Dennis Pierce from Louisburg, Kansas and Dustin Dunkin, of Garnett, Kansas handing out supplies to Robert Lujan and Brian Mestas of Evans, Colorado. Bernie Lujan of Evans, Colorado taking a box of supplies including masks, garbage bags, and paper towels to assist with flood relief cleanup to his home. Photo by Hector Emanuel/American Red Cross

Tuesday, September 17, 2013. 49th St. in Evans, Colorado. American Red Cross emergency response drivers, Dennis Pierce from Louisburg, Kansas and Dustin Dunkin, of Garnett, Kansas handing out supplies to Robert Lujan and Brian Mestas of Evans, Colorado. Bernie Lujan of Evans, Colorado taking a box of supplies including masks, garbage bags, and paper towels to assist with flood relief cleanup to his home. Photo by Hector Emanuel/American Red Cross

In the afternoon, we split from Dennis and Dustin and we headed to a shelter at Timberline Church in Fort Collins This shelter was another place evacuees went to who were rescued off Storm Mountain in Drake, Colorado. While we were there, a bus pulled up, and Jason and Jennifer Morgan, walked off with their three dogs and one cat.  The only road up and down the mountain was washed away, so they had to be evacuated from the mountain by helicopter. They waited as long as they could because they had to leave their nine horses behind.

Tuesday, September 17, 2013. Red Cross shelter at Timberline Church, Fort Collins, Colorado. Red Cross workers, Jody Weyers, of Green Bay, Wisconsin petting “Ella Beagle” and Larry Fortmuller, of Santa Ana, California holding “Bailey” while their owner, Jennifer Morgan, of Drake Colorado, fills out paper work after being airlifted from Storm Mountain by helicopter. .Photo by Hector Emanuel/American Red Cross

Tuesday, September 17, 2013. Red Cross shelter at Timberline Church, Fort Collins, Colorado. Red Cross workers, Jody Weyers, of Green Bay, Wisconsin petting “Ella Beagle” and Larry Fortmuller, of Santa Ana, California holding “Bailey” while their owner, Jennifer Morgan, of Drake Colorado, fills out paper work after being airlifted from Storm Mountain by helicopter. Photo by Hector Emanuel/American Red Cross

The people who were rescued by helicopter, were loaded in busses, delivered to this shelter, and if they had family to stay with, they could pick them up here. If they had no place to go, they would register and stay in the shelter. Everyone who came off the bus, Red Cross had them register with our Safe & Well site, so loved ones searching for them would know they are ok. As of Sunday, September 22, 1,588  people had registered themselves safe and well on our site.

To be continued…..

College Campus Safety

By: PaKou Lee, PR/Social Media Volunteer

With the recent attempted assaults at and near UW-Oshkosh campus it is scary to know that it can happen to anyone: you, me, our friends and even our loved ones. As a recent graduate of UW-Green Bay, I know students stay late at the library studying, have evening classes and group meetings. By the end of the school day, the moon is already shining down on us, probably our only source of light besides a few streetlights.

indexI was a commuter in college and usually planned my walks to my car around times that I know other students would be outside walking also. Typically, it was right after my evening class when everyone in class left too. When I had to stay later than 9p.m. for my sorority meetings, I would move my car from the Kress Center parking lot to the Mary Ann Cofrin (MAC) visitor parking lot to be closer to Union building.  The great thing about the MAC visitor parking lot was that non-visitors could park there after 7p.m.  When sisters parked further away than I did, I offered rides to make sure they got to their car safely.

In continuation of National Preparedness Month, here are some college campus safety tips to help you avoid incidents like in Oshkosh.

Code Blue Emergency Phones: Many colleges and universities have the Code Blue emergency phone available on campus that is directly connected to the University police/security. Know where they are located on your campus and how to use them.

Buddy System: Never walk alone at night. Always walk with a friend or in a group. It will reduce your likeliness of getting hurt. Don’t be afraid to ask friends to meet up with you. You can even ask Campus security to escort you to your car or dorm, like the Community Service Officer Safe Walk Program at UW-Oshkosh. images1

Do Not Take Short Cuts: Walk in areas that are well lit and most traveled by. If you are walking alone, avoid walking near wooded areas.

Stay Alert: Pay attention to your surroundings. You do not want to risk any of your senses, such as hearing. Listening to music reduces your awareness of your surroundings. If you plan to talk on your cellphone so the person on the line is aware of your whereabouts, you can say “I am crossing Leon Bond Dr. now” or “I’m getting into my car now”. But do note that it can make you appear as an easier target because you don’t look focused on your surroundings. When you are near your car, have your keys ready to use and always check behind your backseat before you go inside your car.

When you witness an incident or have been involved in one, don’t be afraid to report it to the Police and Campus Security. Report as soon as possible so you don’t forget any small details and evidence. Dial 9-1-1 or if you are unsure what number to use for campus, ask your Campus Security for more information or find it on your college website.