Pet Safety from Bandit the Prepared Pug – Eye Emergencies

Bandit the Prepared Pug made his debut back in September, and he is back with additional safety tips for Pet Owners, that he found useful after downloading the new Red Cross Pet First Aid App.

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By Bandit the Prepared Pug:

These sunglasses are not just for looks. As a pug, my eyes are more susceptible to issues than most dogs so I have to protect them more (my mom gets worried when I bring her a stick). She downloaded the Red Cross Pet Safety app to know the signs of trouble: red, cloudy, have a discharge, or holding my eye closed or squinting. I am just hoping my eye never comes out of my socket (she learned to keep it moist using a sterile eye wash).

To learn more about eye emergencies and other pet safety tips, download the app directly from the iTunes, Google Play or Amazon Marketplace app stores.

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Pets and Disaster

Thank you to all the staff at Countrycare Animal Complex for our support. and delivery of these much needed kits.

Thank you to all the staff at Countrycare Animal Complex for our support. and delivery of these much needed kits.

Pets enrich our lives in more ways than we can count. They are members of the family. In turn, they depend on us for their safety and well-being.

When Red Cross responders are at residential fires or other disaster our priority is to take care of people. When you have an emergency plan for your pets, (link to arc info) we are truly ensuring their well-being, security and safety too. Having identified the resources and having adequate equipment will help your family care for pets and provide peace of mind during a very stressful situation. Just think of the comfort and compassion your pet will feel when you are prepared!

It’s also through partnerships like ours with the Countrycare Animal Complex, in Green Bay, who has provided emergency pet support. They learned how our responders work with clients and often times they do not have a plan for their pets. Therefore, they supplied us with 100 dog and cat kits to be used in disaster situations. We were surprised when they were all distributed so quickly that they provided another 100 kits. The box kits carry supplies and it can also be used as a carrier for small animals.

  • The dog kit contains: food, bowl, toy, blanket and a leash.
  • The cat kit contains: food, bowl, toy, blanket, litter and  litter box.

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Nancy Mirhashemi, a Red Cross responder, has presented these kits to disaster clients. “They families are always so appreciative. We’re very fortunate to have the Countrycare Animal Complex as our partner so together we can provide comfort and support to the pets and people impacted by a disaster.”

Countrycare is raising funds for the next 100 emergency kits. Please contact them for details on how you can help at (920) 863-3220 and www.countrycareac.com

What is Your Disaster Plan for Your Pets?

By: PaKou Lee, Red Cross PR/Social Media Volunteer

I live with two very sassy, but loving Chihuahuas, Junie and Julie, both belonging to my niece, Nevaeh. I always thought that when a disaster strikes whether it is a tornado or a fire, everyone would gather, grab the dogs and find a safe place to be. As I researched for Preparedness Month, I realized there is much more to planning a pet disaster safety than just grabbing and keeping them safe.

It is not that I think Junie and Julie are less important; they are part of the family too. Many people including myself are just not sure where to start for pet emergencies. I have gathered some important safety tips so we can all be prepared- learn how to prepare for a pet emergency, know what should be included in the portable kit, and how to help your pets recover after a traumatic event.

Prepare:

  • Know which hotels and motels along your evacuation route will accept you and your pets in an emergency. Ask if no pet policies could be waived in an emergency.
  • Most American Red Cross shelters cannot accept pets because of health and safety concerns and other considerations. Service animals that assist people with disabilities are allowed in Red Cross shelters.
  • Include your pets in evacuation drills so that they become used to entering and traveling in their carriers calmly.
  • Make sure that your pet’s vaccinations are current and that all dogs and cats are wearing collars with securely fastened, up-to-date identification. Many pet shelters require proof of current vaccinations to reduce the spread of disease.

Your Kit Should Include:

  • Sturdy leashes, harnesses and/or carriers to transport pets safely and ensure that they can’t escape.
  • Food, drinking water, bowls, litter pans, pet beds and toys.
  • Medications, copies of medical records, your veterinarian’s name and number stored in a waterproof container.
  • A first aid kit.
  • Information on feeding schedules, medical conditions, and behavior problems.

Pet Recovery:

  • Watch your animals closely and keep them under your direct control as fences and gates may have been damaged.
  • Pets may become disoriented, particularly if the disaster has affected scent markers that normally allow them to find their home.
  • Be aware of hazards at nose and paw or hoof level, particularly debris, spilled chemicals, fertilizers and other substances that might not seem to be dangerous to humans.
  • Consult your veterinarian if any behavior problems persist.

    Our Chihuahuas, Julie (top) and Junie (bottom). Aren't they cute?

    Our Chihuahuas, Julie (top) and Junie (bottom).
    Aren’t they cute?

Red Cross also offers Pet First Aid class. You will learn how to administer medication to managing cardiac emergencies and more! If you have animals such as livestock, reptiles, birds, and other small animals, visit Humane Society of the United States or Ready.gov for more information on how to keep your animals safe.