(Re)introducing: Kyle Kriegl, Executive Director, Southwest Wisconsin Chapter of the American Red Cross

By Justin Kern, American Red Cross

After more than 20 years in various leadership and service roles at the American Red Cross, Kyle Kriegl is coming back to where it all started.

Kyle Kriegl has been named the new Executive Director for the Southwest Wisconsin Chapter of the Red Cross.

His Red Cross career started in 1997 as a health and safety director in Monroe and Juneau counties. After a stint in disaster and Service to the Armed Forces (SAF) in Portage County, he came to Madison to serve for years in emergency services and again in health and safety. During the 2000s, he also served as an interim executive in Racine and Janesville, as well as a national role to enhance chapter fundraising and service goals.

In 2008, he became the Chapter Executive in what is now the Northwest Wisconsin Chapter, the leadership role he’s held for the past 12 years.

Kyle Kriegl kicks off the 2020 Heroes Breakfast event in Eau Claire in March.

“I always wanted to come back to Madison if I had the chance. The years in Eau Claire [at the Northwest Wisconsin Chapter office] have helped me gain more executive experience – more experience in Training Services, International [Services] and SAF, Disaster Cycle Services, Biomedical Services. I have a good feel for all our lines of service,” Kriegl said. “I want to go and do great things in Madison.”

Over his career, he considers himself “lucky” to have worked with so many volunteers from the Wisconsin Region, including some from the Southwest Chapter like Sheila Sims and Dan Prevenas. And he said he’s stepping into this new role knowing that there are passionate, steady supporters and board directors, as well as a slew of successful blood drives like the annual “Beach Days” summer donation events in Madison.

Among his varied roles, Kyle shared a few of the Red Cross career highlights so far:

  • Reconnecting members of a Stevens Point family separated by strife in Cambodia, through his community partnerships and just before Christmas
  • Establishing a regional lifeguarding competition in Wisconsin Dells to encourage swim safety
  • Working with disaster teams to provide resources to families devastated by separate tornadoes in Chetek and Oakfield
  • Deploying to help people after Hurricane Katrina and 2003 flooding in Pennsylvania
  • Bolstering events like the annual Northwest Chapter Heroes Breakfast

Along with the career trajectory toward Madison, Kyle and his wife, Kristin, have family in Madison and love University of Wisconsin athletics – especially men’s basketball – and have nabbed pictures of every statue in the “Bucky on Parade” collection.

Kriegl, center, and Maggie Fischer, in volunteer services (at left), give items to volunteers at a 2018 appreciation event in Eau Claire.

Tom Mooney has been serving more than 12 years as Executive Director in the Southwest Chapter, in a dual role as Regional Chief Operating Officer (COO). The organizational shift to separate those roles enables Tom to solely focus as COO. 

Mark Thomas, Wisconsin Region Chief Executive Officer, said: “Tom has been a true community leader in every sense for the city and region he loves so much. We’re indebted to his years at the helm in the Madison area and look forward to the unique leadership he’ll continue to provide as COO.”

“In Kyle Kriegl, we have an experienced Red Cross leader with the drive to lead our mission in Madison, La Crosse, Beloit, Janesville, Tomah and throughout southwestern Wisconsin,” Thomas added.

Kyle’s first official day in the new Executive Director role is Monday, Nov. 30. For information on the opportunity to lead our Northwest Wisconsin Chapter, visit the Red Cross careers page.

American Red Cross seeks your community hero nominations for 2021 Brave Hearts honors

MILWAUKEE, Wisc., Nov. 24, 2020 – Do you know a hero living in our community? Someone who has saved a life or whose actions inspire others? Someone who makes southeastern Wisconsin a better place every day?

The Southeast Wisconsin Chapter of the American Red Cross is now accepting nominations of inspiring local people for consideration at our 2021 Brave Hearts community heroes event. We’re looking for your nominations of people who have performed or continue to perform heroic acts in 2020 across a handful of categories.

Brave Hearts heroes are being accepted until Jan. 31 in the following categories:

George Koerner was selected as our most recent Military Hero for his passionate work with fellow veterans.
  • Community Safety, Security & Resiliency – use of knowledge, skills or research to provide aid to the life of another
  • Emergency Response – first responder exhibiting heroism on or off-duty, or in an ongoing and extraordinary effort toward community support
  • From the Heart – blood donor or blood drive supporter
  • Military – member of the Armed Forces exhibiting heroism in response to an emergency situation, on or off-duty
  • Youth – involved in a heroic act at 18-years old or younger

Nominees must live, work or the heroic act of courage or kindness must have occurred in one of the following counties: Dodge, Kenosha, Milwaukee, Ozaukee, Racine, Walworth, Washington or Waukesha. A specific heroic act must have occurred in the past year, from Jan. 1, 2020 to Dec. 31, 2020; an act of courage or kindness can be ongoing or have occurred at a particular time. From the nominees, a committee also selects a lifetime award for the Brave Hearts event.

Nominate a hero before Jan. 31 and find more details here: https://www.redcross.org/local/wisconsin/about-us/news-and-events/events/brave-hearts/brave-hearts-nomination.html

The annual Brave Hearts fundraising gala is slated to be a virtual event in May 2021.

Father and son volunteer duo deploy with same mindset: to help others

By Rachel Helgeson, American Red Cross

The bond between a father and a son is a strong one, both impacting the other for a lifetime.

But one bond between a Wisconsin father and son goes beyond the ties of family and extends to complete strangers in need of help.

Theodore “Ted” King II and his son Theodore “Theo” King III were deployed to New Orleans with the American Red Cross beginning October 19, coincidentally the day of Ted’s birthday. These selfless men spent two weeks of their evenings working a desk at a hotel, fielding questions from volunteers or clients affected by the hurricanes throughout the night.

Ted, left, and Theo King volunteer during the night shift at a hotel shelter in New Orleans, where people were displaced after a record hurricane season.

With Ted’s retirement and Theo’s furlough from his job as a field evaluator lining up and allowing free time, the father and son were able to deploy together at the same time. And they did so during an historic hurricane season along the Gulf Coast.

“It’s a good opportunity to spend time with dad,” Theo said humbly in a phone interview during the deployment. “More than ever right now people are hurting with the economy, pandemic, and hurricanes. I’ve worked in hospitality all my working life since 14; giving back is part of my identity.”

Although the father and son were in charge of providing help logistically, the two were also able to experience giving back to the community in a physical and immediate manner in downtown New Orleans.

“The most intrinsically-rewarding thing to happen was we had 50 extra dinners from last night and one of the bellmen escorted us to pass out meals to the homeless,” Theo explained.

Just a few weeks ago was Ted’s first time connecting with the Red Cross although he had already been friends with Mark Thomas, Wisconsin Red Cross CEO, and was aware of the organization’s impact. Theo has been a part of the organization since June.

Ted’s first volunteer experience was one he’ll never forget, he said. He had the opportunity to personally understand what the Red Cross is all about.

Helping people as part of fall 2020 sheltering operations, the Kings found matched newfound free-time with their drive to give back as volunteers.

“The Red Cross is much more complex than I expected,” Ted said. “Organizing, the personnel, I can’t imagine how much they must be working to manage or supervise a site or overseeing a particular area. I’m pleased to help people out as they need, it would take a lot of training to be able to do what some are doing.”

Ted added he plans on continuing to volunteer, but hopes to get a feel for daytime shifts and other duties.

“I like doing this,” Ted said. “Working with others who like helping others, having the same mission or mindset as far as helping the clients.”

To join disaster volunteers working together near and far, register here.

Air Force veteran gives back to the military as a Red Cross volunteer

By Andrea Azzo, American Red Cross

Wayne MacDonald’s life has been dedicated to serving others. It wasn’t long after he got out of the Air Force when the Wisconsin man decided to volunteer with the American Red Cross.

Now, nearly 34 years later, the Stevens Point man is nearing the end of his stint with the Red Cross. MacDonald is turning 72 years old on Nov. 26. His goal is to continue serving until he reaches the 35-year benchmark with the nonprofit organization.

“The Red Cross is so important with so many different things,” MacDonald said. “Supporting the military side is the biggest thing [for me].”

MacDonald’s volunteerism has been focused Service to the Armed Forces, the department at the Red Cross that helps service members, veterans and their families. He knows firsthand how difficult it can be to transition from the military to civilian life.

MacDonald served for 10 years in the Air Force and for 20 years in the Air Force Reserve. He has been stationed overseas in Turkey, England and Germany; plus in the U.S. at military bases in Alaska and Texas.

When he spent one and a half years in Turkey, MacDonald said he did not know what kind of assistance was available to him. Even today, he says other military families aren’t sure where to go if something happens.

That’s where his work with the Red Cross comes into play. MacDonald’s primary duty includes communicating with military families to make them aware of the support that exists. This includes notifying service members when a loved one back home falls seriously ill or dies.

The Red Cross’ work has evolved over time. When MacDonald began volunteering, letters informed service members. Now the Red Cross puts a service member in touch with military families. 

Most of the time, MacDonald says feedback is positive and communication is fast. Sometimes, families are surprised at how quickly they receive important news.

Other Service to the Armed Forces volunteer opportunities include canteening at veteran Honor Flight celebrations, like this one in May 2019 in Beloit.

The Red Cross of Wisconsin primarily helps service members and veterans within the state, but there have been instances in which other Red Cross chapters have needed Wisconsin’s help. MacDonald says he has helped the Red Cross in Florida when there was a hurricane. He has also covered Minnesota when there was a shortage of volunteers.

MacDonald primarily helps over the phone. (He has never met anyone he has helped face-to-face.)

“The main thing for me is to provide, whatever their need is,” MacDonald said. “Knowing they had a need, through the Red Cross, they got support. That’s the main thing.”

For more on the many ways the Red Cross supports veterans, service members and their families – and to join volunteers like Wayne – click here.

Introducing: Jennifer Clearwater, Regional Philanthropy Officer, American Red Cross of Wisconsin

By Justin Kern, American Red Cross

Jennifer Clearwater recently joined our fund development team in the Wisconsin Region, bringing a range of philanthropic expertise and a true enthusiasm in connecting supporters with the mission of the American Red Cross.

A few weeks in, and she’s already making connections for people displaced by a Milwaukee apartment building fire, along with no shortage of internal training and on-boarding. We recently invited Jennifer to share answers to a few questions at the start of her Red Cross journey.

What drew you to the mission of the Red Cross?

Clearwater: Working for the Red Cross is sincerely a dream come true. Early in my career, when I knew that I was pursuing fundraising as a profession, I had it in my mind that someday I might be experienced enough to work for the American Red Cross, and now here I am!

I believe the Red Cross is the most important nonprofit in our country, and our country’s most important non-governmental partner. It is truly an honor to be on the team and working with the amazingly generous donors and volunteers who truly make all our services possible. 

Do you have a connection with the Red Cross prior to joining our team? (blood donor, military family, etc.)

Clearwater: Well, my favorite color is red, so there’s that … Our family has been blessed to have never been in a position to have needed the services of the Red Cross, but my husband, brother, and extended members of our family and friends are either currently active military or veterans, so the American Red Cross has always been the organization we knew would be there for them if they found themselves needing assistance domestically or internationally.

I also recently donated blood for the first time – the new Blood Donor app is terrific for scheduling appointments and I highly recommend everyone downloading it if you haven’t already. I was a little nervous going in to my first blood donation, but it was an energizing experience and I’ve already used the Blood Donor app again to schedule my next donation. 

What are some professional high points for you so far?

Clearwater: I’ve been blessed to have had opportunities to raise donations for and leave a positive mark on several important Wisconsin institutions, like Polish Fest, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, and the YMCA of Metropolitan Milwaukee. Working for the American Red Cross is a dream come true for me; quite frankly, this is the most important job I’ve ever had, and I am delighted to be here at this highly critical time in our nation’s history to support the giving that makes Red Cross donors most fulfilled. 

Coming into the organization during this dramatic time, when we’re dealing with the daily effects of COVID-19 as well as disaster upon disaster has been interesting to say the least. Sort of like jumping onto a moving treadmill that’s set for Olympic gold medal sprinter speed while simultaneously drinking from a firehose … but I wouldn’t have it any other way and have already begun connecting with our generous supporters about the tremendous needs of the times. I’m looking forward to helping them and our volunteers and staff partner their resources to deliver critical services to our fellow ‘Sconnies and Americans today and for many years to come.

Outside of your career, what else would you like people to know about you right out the gates?

Clearwater: Rob – my husband of 27 years – and I are blessed with two healthy, smart, loving, and beautiful daughters, Emily and Paige. We all live in picturesque Port Washington, where I am also humbled to be a volunteer political appointee on our city’s Police and Fire Commission. I additionally have the honor of serving as a volunteer board director for Ozaukee County’s Riveredge Nature Center. 

Reach out to Jennifer on ways to put your generosity into action with the Red Cross at Jennifer.Clearwater@redcross.org

‘It’s a changing experience’: how Wisconsin volunteers are helping families decimated by wildfires in Oregon

By Justin Kern, American Red Cross

Hundreds of American Red Cross disaster teams have been working with families in crisis for months after a wave of hurricanes and wildfires ravaging the United States. Hillary Wanecke, of Delafield, Wisconsin has been involved with the Red Cross in humanitarian relief since Hurricane Katrina. Last week, she returned from a deployment in Oregon, where deadly wildfires decimated communities.

In this brief conversation, Wanecke shared with us the differences of deploying for disaster relief during a pandemic and the ways she was still able to let reeling families know that they weren’t alone in this battle.

You are someone known around southeast Wisconsin for your work helping people after home fires or other local disasters. But you’ve also deployed to do different types of roles in humanitarian relief after large-scale disasters. Tell me a bit about your role after the wildfires in Oregon and where you were.

Hillary Wanecke, left, was part of a team that checked on affected homes and residents after wildfires in Oregon. Photo by Lynette Nyman / American Red Cross

Wanecke: On this deployment I went out in Disaster Assessment … so I went into areas that had been affected by the wildfire – it had been burning for about two weeks. We went through trying to find out which homes were affected and which weren’t and that is used for the recovery process, so that Red Cross and other agencies can help people with the things they need to recover. A lot of the roads for the addresses we had were closed, some of the assessments started virtually, where we mapped out the locations of the houses based on what the Sheriff’s [Department] said. When the streets opened up after a few days, we drove by these addresses and verified. It seemed like there was a wind storm that just kicked up this fire and people had to evacuate within minutes. They just had to leave everything. That was heart-breaking. I was around the town of Blue River [Oregon], population of about 900 on the McKenzie River. It burned to the ground. There wasn’t one building left, commercial or home in that little community.

You have hundreds of thousands of acres of woodland [in this part of Oregon]. These fires started from the lightning and the wind. At the beginning, around the beginning of September, they thought that they had these fires contained. These communities have existed here for hundreds of years, beautiful backdrops of the mountains and filled with these pristine trees. And the wind picked up, the fires kicked up and they just rolled down. … What was amazing was in some places, one house was standing and the next three houses were ashes. It seems like luck of the draw but no matter who you were, if you were in the path of it, you were really in trouble.

What were some of the homeowners you talked with saying about how they escaped, what they went through to get out?

Wanecke: One guy was very prepared, a younger man who had a satellite phone, a generator. He had kind of organized people in his community of McKenzie Ridge, for water and necessities, his own little help center. His house wasn’t burned. He said he went to sleep that night, knowing there was a wind storm [coming]. He was prepared for that but he thought the power might go out. So, what did he do? He turned off his phone to preserve power. And he woke up and the fire saved his house, but it torched the rest of the community. He was like a lot of people, he went to bed and it was fine and then it escalated to … people had to flee with whatever they had on them.

You’re just thinking that this fire is still going. If the winds changed, if the forecast changed, it wasn’t good.

What were some of the resources you and your Red Cross teams were able to bring people.

In the town of Blue River, Ore., Wanecke, left, and fellow disaster volunteers gathered information used to provide financial and other assistance to hundreds of families who lost everything to wildfires. Photo by Lynette Nyman / American Red Cross

Wanecke: We’ve got this great technology and we were able to go around, find addresses, locate people who had been affected. Then, we were able to share with victims where they could get help. In the aftermath, they left so quickly, they may have been staying in cars, staying with relatives. They were shell-shocked. We were able to connect with people to get them into hotels from the Red Cross, to get them registered that they were affected by this so that they could start a case with us [for potential financial assistance], with FEMA, other agencies. After the initial days, we were doing “hot shot” calls, for people seeking help. We’d get a call from someone who evacuated who’d say, “My house, I’m not sure if it was affected, it’s at this address.” People couldn’t go back in to their communities. And if we hadn’t identified it previously, we’d go out to see the status of the house.

Now, we’re talking with people who are existing volunteers and recruit new volunteers to help with these wildfires and other disasters going on, either in person or virtually. What would you say to someone about the personal reward you find in deploying like this, even with all the considerations?

Wanecke: I was nervous about going out, during the pandemic. But you’re very well covered. The Red Cross has a lot of good training, specialty training related to COVID-19 … We’ve changed procedures during this. We’ve all gotten very good at [Microsoft] Teams and we’re using other technology more smartly. But we pivot where we have to. Some of the cell towers burned so we were doing work back on pen and paper.

It’s a changing experience. The Red Cross sees a need and it finds a way to fill it. If we can’t serve people out of Cambros, those big, red meal containers, we’ll find a way of packaging those meals and getting them to the people. If we can’t have a large congregate shelter in the basement of a church with 200 people, then we’re going to find a hotel and run it like a shelter, to get the people housed and fed. It’s a little different, you’re not hugging people. But you’re still getting information out to people and there are a lot of people who need this help, between the fires, the storms down South, the home fires locally. It’s a mess out there. But we’ve made it work.

Was there a moment you had with someone from Oregon, affected by these wildfires?

Wanecke: This one couple … she had just gotten out of the hospital and was sitting on her walker while her husband took a sieve through the ashes of their trailer home.

We found out from them that they had evacuated and this was their first time back to their trailer, which was in ash. And they had been sleeping in a tent. She was just out of the hospital … [from] a back surgery. When you think it can’t get any worse …

We let them know that they didn’t have to sleep in a tent. We got them in touch with the Red Cross in Eugene [Oregon] and found a hotel room for them and food was being delivered. … [W]hen you’re knocked on your tail with a disaster like that, sometimes common sense can go out the window. You are so overwhelmed. We were able to tell this couple that they didn’t have to do this by themselves.

You can join volunteers like Hillary in a number of roles that help people in need. Find roles for today’s disasters at redcross.org/VolunteerToday

‘We need some good in the world’: American Red Cross Club leader dedicates days to public service

By Rachel Helgeson, American Red Cross

While it seems the whole world is experiencing many “no’s” in this time of job loss, social distancing, and civil and political unrest, one young woman decided to give a resounding ‘yes’ to the public service.

Carly Langkamp, a 22-year-old Darlington, Wisc. native, dedicated herself once again to upholding two new volunteer roles with the American Red Cross immediately after graduating from University of Wisconsin – Madison in May.

Carly Langkamp, right, talks with prospective Red Cross volunteers and club members at a 2019 event on UW-Madison campus.

She had already volunteered years and hundreds of hours to the Red Cross Club at her college, even sitting as the Vice President of the group.

As a college freshman, Carly first said “yes” to the Red Cross Club and stuck with it because of those she was surrounded by, although there were only three individuals in the fundraising committee where she first volunteered.

“There was something about the Red Cross, I vibed with the other people there,” Carly said. “I really like the people.”

But now, even amidst a pandemic, a new position in the business world, and an upcoming move to Chicago, nothing could keep Carly away from volunteering for the Wisconsin Red Cross.

“We need some good in the world, especially now. If people have time why not? I would want someone to do the same for me that I am doing for other people,” she said.

Carly sees the value in giving her time as a Volunteer Recognition Lead and a Youth Engagement Lead, where she is able to work virtually to uplift, support, and acknowledge adult and student volunteers around the state.

As a Volunteer Recognition Lead, Carly works with Jocelyn Berkhahn, the Wisconsin Region Volunteer Engagement Specialist, to coordinate birthday wishes for volunteers and answers questions.

Langkamp, left of T-shirt in front row, poses with their Madison Red Cross Club in 2019.

In her Youth Engagement Lead position, Carly oversees five college Red Cross Clubs, just like the one she was in at UW-Madison, and three high school clubs.

“There are two new clubs pending which is pretty cool,” Carly said. “I send youth Happy Birthday’s and get them registered and if they have questions I help. With this virtual environment we’re trying to brainstorm activities to participate.”

Although her work and volunteer lifestyle is keeping her busy, Carly keeps in mind why she does what she does.

“What I get from it is enjoyment, I am glad that I am able to help Jocelyn out,” she said. “I don’t see myself stopping volunteering, unless work keeps me from giving as much as I would want. Even if that would happen, I’d still try to find a way to help out.”

Find out more about Red Cross Club opportunities at your school. Email Jocelyn to get involved and make a difference in our world.

Volunteer Donna Forbes is driven to share with others

By Katie Baneck, American Red Cross

Donna Forbes has been an American Red Cross volunteer since 1999. But her service to other people goes back much farther.

“I grew up in a family where I learned from example that no matter how little you had, you shared with those that had even less,” Forbes said.

What started as odd jobs around the office later turned into casework for the Service to the Armed Forces (SAF) area of the Red Cross. Donna’s casework with the SAF began while her husband was serving in the Reserves, making the role a natural fit for her.

As time went on, she decided to branch out and work with the Disaster Action Team, bringing comfort to those affected by some of life’s unimaginable hardships. 

As an educator, Donna took advantage of her network of students and their families. She held fundraisers for the Red Cross and shared its vision with her school community. Donna believed it was important to teach her students about social responsibility and the positive impact they could make within their community through volunteering and philanthropy.

Donna started doing casework for the Red Cross Disaster Services while living at MacDill Airforce Base in Tampa, Fla. It was here she witnessed firsthand accounts of the poor living situations people can be left to after surviving a disaster. Being a caseworker enabled Donna to assist with improving the well-being of people in the community by working with them to develop recovery plans. She found this work most crucial in the first few days following a disaster, when her clients were still experiencing the shock and abruptness from their situations.

Eventually moving to Wisconsin, Donna became a Casework Supervisor. This role exposed her to many new people within the Red Cross volunteer community. Donna found it rewarding being surrounded by dedicated, like-minded people all fighting for the Red Cross mission. While she finds it uplifting to be part of such an inspiring community, Donna was honest about the frustrations one can experience as a volunteer.

“I think it is not being able to do more” for people in crisis, she said.

In any organization, volunteers are limited in their reach. While the COVID-19 pandemic has affected the way in which Red Cross volunteers are able to perform their acts of service and get help to the community, people like Donna are still putting in the work and driving the mission forward.

Find a volunteer opportunity that fits your interests, passions and schedule. Visit redcross.org/VolunteerToday and join dedicated volunteers like Donna.

Donate with Red Cross to help ensure a diverse blood supply

EAU CLAIRE, Wis. (Sept. 11, 2020) – The American Red Cross needs people of all races and ethnicities to give blood to help ensure a blood supply as diverse as the patients who depend on it.

For a small percentage of the population, finding someone else with the same blood type can be difficult. While the vast majority of people have types A, B, O or AB blood, some blood types are unique to certain racial and ethnic groups, so a diverse blood supply is important to meeting the medical needs of a diverse patient population. Patients who require frequent blood transfusions as part of their treatment, like those with sickle cell disease or other lifelong blood disorders, often need close blood type matches to prevent complications from their transfusion therapy.

Mark Thomas, American Red Cross – Wisconsin Region CEO, smiles behind his mask as he makes a life-saving blood donation during an August drive in Milwaukee.

All blood types are needed to ensure that the right blood product is available at the right time for all patients.

Make an appointment to donate by downloading the free Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting RedCrossBlood.org, calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or enabling the Blood Donor Skill on any Alexa Echo device. Blood drives are also essential in helping ensure blood is available for patients this winter. To learn more and sign up to host a blood drive this fall or winter, visit RedCrossBlood.org/HostADrive

Important COVID-19 information for donors

The Red Cross is testing blood, platelet and plasma donations for COVID-19 antibodies. The test may indicate if the donor’s immune system has produced antibodies to this coronavirus, regardless of whether they developed symptoms. Red Cross antibody tests will be helpful to identify individuals who have COVID-19 antibodies and may qualify to be convalescent plasma donors. Convalescent plasma is a type of blood donation collected from COVID-19 survivors that have antibodies that may help patients who are actively fighting the virus. Donors can expect to receive the results of their antibody test within 7 to 10 days through the Red Cross Blood Donor App or the donor portal at RedCrossBlood.org.

The Red Cross is not testing donors to diagnose illness, referred to as a diagnostic test. To protect the health and safety of Red Cross staff and donors, it is important that individuals who do not feel well or believe they may be ill with COVID-19 postpone donation.

Each Red Cross blood drive and donation center follows the highest standards of safety and infection control, and additional precautions – including temperature checks, social distancing and face coverings for donors and staff – have been implemented to help protect the health of all those in attendance. Donors are asked to schedule an appointment prior to arriving at the drive and are required to wear a face covering or mask while at the drive, in alignment with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention public guidance.  

For media interest:

Annual membership notice for Southeast Wisconsin Chapter of the American Red Cross

The American Red Cross – Southeast Wisconsin Chapter is inviting all eligible members to join our annual membership meeting at 7:30 a.m., Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020.

Membership is open to anyone who has made a monetary contribution, performed volunteer service and/or donated blood to the American Red Cross. The purpose of membership is to promote community understanding, commitment and support of the Red Cross mission and services.

This annual meeting will be led by the Board of Directors of the Southeast Chapter and will include election of officers as well as regular business updates.

This meeting will be held virtually via Microsoft Teams, out of a continuing abundance of caution due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

For an invitation to the meeting or other questions, reach out to Regional CEO and Southeast Wisconsin Chapter Executive Mark Thomas at mark.thomas3@redcross.org