260 People Received Red Cross Assistance After Home Fires, Other Disasters in March

MILWAUKEE, Wisc. (April 2, 2020) — Even during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, emergencies don’t stop and neither does the work of the American Red Cross. Every day, local volunteers are still providing care and comfort after disasters, such as home fires.

In the month of March, Red Cross disaster workers in Wisconsin responded to 81 incidents, providing assistance to 260 people all across Wisconsin (see map). Volunteers primarily helped families after home fires (79 incidents), with the addition of health measures and virtual work to keep this important support moving ahead for people in crisis.March 2020 fires WI ARC

“Our responses remained higher than average in March. As the realities of COVID-19 hit our state and nation, our disaster teams worked with public health officials, took on new training and added health and distancing measures to keep this work moving ahead, safely,” said Justin Kern, Communications Officer for the Wisconsin Region of the Red Cross. “We’re urging everyone to take steps while you’re observing stay-at-home measures to minimize the risk of fires in your own home.”

Along with the 79 fires in March – more than two per day, which is above our typical state average – Red Cross disaster teams also responded to help people at a building collapse in Racine and a transportation incident in Milwaukee.


You can support this ongoing mission for our neighbors in need by joining as a volunteer or by making a donation at redcross.org.


Our top priority is protecting the people we serve and our volunteers, so we have adopted new guidelines and tactics as we continue to support our communities. All volunteer responders and clients are asked health screening questions prior to meeting at a disaster scene. We also have the technology in place to issue immediate disaster assistance on a virtual basis. We have implemented steps to keep clients and volunteers safe from close contact, while at the same time providing financial assistance for items such as food, clothing, shelter and medications. The Red Cross also offers mental health support in beginning the long-term recovery process.

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American Red Cross disaster volunteers Dave Flowers, left, and Kevin Connell don protective face shields and gloves as they deliver hygiene supplies to a shelter run by the National Guard in Milwaukee. (Photo by Justin Kern / American Red Cross)

We continue to work closely with public health officials to deliver our mission where and when it’s safe to do so. This work includes additional support and partnerships through the state Emergency Operations Center to address the needs of people during this evolving emergency.

Stay Safe and Help #EndHomeFires

The Red Cross is asking everyone to take simple steps to reduce the risk of a fire in your home and to help save lives. While many are home from work and school with their families, now is the perfect time to talk about home fire safety and practice your home fire escape plan.

  • Make sure everyone in the family knows how to get out of every room and how to get out of the home in two minutes or less.
  • Teach children the sound of a smoke alarm when you practice your home fire escape plan.
  • Select a meeting spot at a safe distance away from your home, such as a neighbor’s home or a tree in the front yard, so everyone knows where to meet.
  • Visit org/homefires for additional free resources and safety tips.

For additional COVID-19 (a.k.a. Coronavirus) safety tips and resources, click here.

‘People will get it done’: Q&A with Dave Nelson, government operations volunteer working on Coronavirus response

By Justin Kern, American Red Cross

With any large-scale disaster, there is a significant amount of work behind the scenes to set up food, shelter, assistance and more on the ground. Rarely has that “behind-the-scenes” effort been more vital than during the present COVID-19 pandemic. By its nature, this health emergency has resulted in isolation, social distancing and other remote efforts. This is where the strategy, networking and smarts of American Red Cross volunteers like Dave Nelson make a huge impact. From a post at the State Emergency Operations Center in Madison, as well as virtually, Nelson has led the Red Cross response to the Coronavirus emergency.

Nelson started at the Red Cross about eight years ago, including stints as a disaster action team volunteer and board president with the Northwest Wisconsin Chapter. Nelson, a retired finance officer for hospital systems who lives in Eau Claire with his wife, shares details on this unique Red Cross volunteer role – and one-of-a-kind disaster response.

Dave Nelson headshot

Dave Nelson

For starters, how do you kind of describe your volunteer role to friends or people on the street?

“I say that, ‘If we do our job here [in the Emergency Operations Center], that’s how we coordinate where to set up shelters, where our partners could use our assistance, and where people are most in need.”

What are some of the duties as a Government Operations volunteer?

“Where we usually work is in the E.O.C. [Emergency Operations Center]. That could be with the state, county or municipality. We coordinate the emergency response with all of the local authorities, including, like here with the state Department of Health Services, the National Guard, FEMA … all those types of agencies so there is a coordinated effort by all entities to provide the response needs in the places that it is most needed. … For Red Crossers, this role used to be called ‘Government Liaison.’”


Volunteers make the mission of the American Red Cross come to life. Find volunteer opportunities that fit your interests at redcross.org/volunteer.


Had you done this role before the Coronavirus response?

“First time I did this was during the Bad River Floods in 2016. For Hurricane Florence, I was the government operations [lead] in South Carolina for 15 counties in that response. I was at the Camp Fire in Paradise, California and last summer I was with the state of Oklahoma for flooding.”

Compare and contrast for us, the differences and similarities with a natural disaster like a hurricane in your role, and what’s happening with your role during this COVID-19 response.

Vol Dave Nelson at State EOC 3-16-20

Dave Nelson, at right in hat, on the first day at the State Emergency Operations Center in Madison.

“What is similar: I’m working with the federal, state and local authorities in the E.O.C. We also coordinate a lot with V.O.A.D. [Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters] groups, too, to help find other resources where we all have a gap to fill. The players from the agency standpoint are pretty much the same. In hurricanes, for instance, the majority of our work is … supplies, feeding and sheltering of people. What makes this one very different is that we’re not doing any sheltering. We have special rules because we’re dealing with a pandemic, which is something not many of us have worked with before. The coordination becomes different. The state and counties are working on isolation shelters, more of a medical shelter and different from congregate shelters … Using Red Cross and FEMA resources, we helped put together a shelter operating manual with DHS so that they can operate and better understand the processes involved in operating shelters. DHS is taking the lead and we’re assisting, providing guidance, supplies and resources. They’re the health experts. It may seem small to anyone outside but it’s really under a whole different set of rules to ensure infection does not spread and medical needs are met.”

I’ve been at E.O.C.s in the past in Madison and this one was definitely different from day one. Can you share the differences from the perspective of where and how you’re working?

“We walk through medical screenings before we can even get into the [E.O.C.] building. We’ve been working, spaced apart somewhat … and we are now dispersing into what we call ‘Virtual E.O.C.’, using web access, phones, email. That is important [based on gathering guidelines], but we’ll be doing a lot more calling, relying on technology much more. People will get it done. These people in the E.O.C., they work hard and they take tasks seriously. Whatever needs to get done, gets done. And that’s the fun part, really, solving problems and executing the plan.”

A couple of weeks into this pandemic, what have been some of the early successes?

“Some of the blood drive need and safety information, getting that language passed along to help the state and governor’s office to support the need for blood drives and collection. The other big one for me was, on day two, getting involved with the isolation sheltering task force. I was able to find policy and standards manuals and intake forms as a start, based on Red Cross, FEMA things I know about sheltering, and contacts I had from other states already going these response issues in heavily impacted areas in California, where they’re a little ahead of Wisconsin in dealing with the COVID-19 response. Our team was able to then bring in a shelter expert, Barbara Gugel, to work full-time with the Isolation Task Force to develop and put that isolation sheltering process into place. It’s where your networking and working well with new people, treating each other well, really comes into play.”

This is a pretty unique role with the Red Cross. What qualities would you say help to have for someone who may want to get involved like you in government operations?

“You have to be even tempered. Don’t take anything personally, there is so much going on and people can get stressed, people are tired. If you can handle the pressure of working 12-to-15 hours a day and coordinate with numerous types of people, [those are] the skills you really need. Even if it’s a role that comes up once or twice a year, don’t get frustrated with that. At the end of the day, we’re here to help people the best we can. We play a very important role, and our government partners, our nonprofit partners, they all know that.”

You can make an impact in your community as a volunteer with the American Red Cross. Find volunteer opportunities that fit your passion at redcross.org/volunteer

Coronavirus: Safety and Readiness Tips for You

From the American Red Cross

ARC coronavirus safety 3-16-2020The American Red Cross is closely monitoring the outbreak of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and following the latest guidance from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

We know this is a stressful time and people want to know what they can do right now to protect themselves and their families. That’s why the Red Cross is highlighting some everyday health and preparedness steps that people in the U.S. can take now.

There are also special recommendations for people who may be at a higher risk which you can find below.

LIMIT THE SPREAD OF GERMS AND PREVENT INFECTION

The Red Cross recommends following common sense steps to help prevent the spread of any respiratory virus.

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after being in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Put distance between yourself and other people if COVID-19 is spreading in your community.
  • Stay home if you are sick, except to get medical care.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing; throw used tissues in the trash. If a tissue isn’t available, cough or sneeze into your elbow or sleeve, not your hands.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, handles, desks, computers, phones, keyboards, sinks, toilets and countertops.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them – use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection. Full information on how to disinfect found here.
  • Wear a facemask if you are sick. You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office.

GET YOUR HOUSEHOLD READY

There are things you can do right now to be ready for any emergency, and many of these same tips will help you prepare as the coronavirus situation continues to evolve in the U.S.

  • Have a supply of food staples and household supplies like laundry detergent and bathroom items, and diapers if you have small children.
  • Check to make sure you have at least a 30-day supply of your prescription medications, and have other health supplies on hand, including pain relievers, stomach remedies, cough and cold medicines, fluids with electrolytes and vitamins.
  • Know how your local public health agency will share information in your community and stay informed. Find more information here.
  • Learn how your children’s school or daycare, and your workplace will handle a possible outbreak. Create a plan in the event of any closings, event cancellations or postponements.
  • If you care for older adults or children, plan and prepare for caring for them, should they or you become sick.
  • Help family members and neighbors get prepared and share the safety messaging with those who may not have access to it.

According to the CDC, patients with COVID-19 have reportedly had mild to severe respiratory illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure and include fever, cough and shortness of breath. Call your doctor if you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop symptoms.

WHO IS AT A HIGHER RISK?

COVID-19 is a new disease, which means scientists and public health experts are still learning how it spreads, the severity of illness it causes and to what extent it may spread in the U.S.

Early information shows that some people are at higher risk of getting very sick from this virus. This includes older adults and people who have serious chronic medical conditions like heart disease, diabetes and lung disease.

If you are at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19 because of your age or a serious medical condition, it is extra important for you to take actions to avoid getting sick.

  • Take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others.
  • When you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick, limit close contact and wash your hands often.
  • Avoid crowds as much as possible.
  • Stock up on supplies.
    • Contact your healthcare provider to ask about obtaining extra necessary medications to have on hand in case there is an outbreak of COVID-19 in your community and you need to stay home for a prolonged period of time.
    • If you cannot get extra medications, consider using a mail-order option.
    • Be sure you have over-the-counter medicines and medical supplies (tissues, etc.) to treat fever and other symptoms. Most people will be able to recover from COVID-19 at home.
    • Have enough household items and groceries on hand so that you will be prepared to stay at home for a period of time.

During a COVID-19 outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible. Full information for those at a higher risk is available here.

UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION

For the latest information, please visit the CDC website at cdc.gov/covid19.

If you live outside the United States, health and safety tips can be found through the World Health Organization and by following your local Red Cross or Red Crescent society’s social media channels.

Download Helpful Tip Sheets For Steps to Help Protect Against Coronavirus COVID-19. Available in multiple languages.
English | Spanish | French | Haitian | Chinese | Korean | Vietnamese | Tagalog

Stand Down 101 (and details behind a recent Red Cross award)

By Katie Baneck, American Red Cross

The American Red Cross of Wisconsin has been involved in veteran “Stand Down” events across the state for years. But what exactly what are these events? And why did the Red Cross receive an award at the recent Milwaukee Stand Down?

On Saturday, February 22 the American Legion hosted the bi-annual Milwaukee Stand Down. Held at the Wisconsin National Guard Armory, of the Richards Street Armory, in Milwaukee, the event engages hundreds of veterans at events in February and September.

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The Milwaukee Stand Down event brings a “hand up, not a hand out” to hundreds of volunteers each year.

The purpose of the Stand Down is to bring a variety of resources together under one roof and to provide those services to homeless and at-risk veterans. The dozens of supporters span government, nonprofit and private organizations. Assistance at the event ranges from employment, housing, legal aid, medical and additional access to U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs resources, as well as a range of every day social services, such as haircuts. In two examples behind the scenes, Rockwell Automation operated a clothing closet and Molson Coors provided bagged lunches.

The event is truly about providing a hand up, not a hand out. Like all veterans, those who come to these events made sacrifices to serve our country, and the transition from service to civilian life can be difficult. At the Milwaukee Stand Down in February, Matt Beattie with veteran support nonprofit DryHootch put it this way. Beattie said that while he was able to do what was required to receive the necessary benefits after service, it is not easy for everyone. He’s had friends give up mid-process, because accessing your benefits can be a long and somewhat difficult process, depending on how you were affected during your service. Fortunately, Milwaukee’s office of Veteran’s Affairs participates in the Stand Down Rally in a variety of capacities. Homeless vets can utilize services at the rally that they might not otherwise have easy access to on a regular basis.

SAF Michelle and Rich at Milwaukee Stand Down Feb 2020

Michelle Matuszak, left, and Richard Seymour, both with the American Red Cross Service to the Armed Forces team, recently accepted the Founder’s Award from the Milwaukee Stand Down. 

The Stand Down has been going on for close to 30 years now, and the Red Cross has been participating for almost as long. As part of its Service to the Armed Forces (SAF) mission, Red Cross volunteers and staff provide a swath of immediate needs and connections to ongoing resources to veterans at these events. And this year, Red Cross SAF leaders were recognized with the Founder’s Award.

The plaque, presented to Michelle Matuszak and Rich Seymour, reads: “In recognition of their outstanding contributions and years of dedicated service to the Homeless Veterans of Milwaukee County and their families … Thank you for caring enough to make a difference.”

When asked why participating in this event is so important, Seymour, himself a veteran, cited part of the Red Cross drive to provide service members, veterans and their families “around the clock, around the globe, under a trusted symbol.”

“We also want to give them the tools to get back on their feet, find employment and housing, so that they are enjoying their life to the fullest,” Seymour concluded.

To get involved in the Milwaukee Stand Down event, click here.

American Red Cross – Northwest WI Chapter honors local heroes at March event

(EAU CLAIRE, Wisc., Feb. 26, 2020) – Our community is filled with every day heroes. This March, the Northwest Wisconsin Chapter of the American Red Cross will once again honor a select group of the heroes among us.

The annual Heroes Breakfast will take place from 7:30-9 a.m., Wednesday, March 11 at the Florian Gardens in Eau Claire.

Kyle WQOW Peter Hestekin Feb 2020

Military hero Peter Hestekin, center, poses with Kyle Kriegl, Northwest Wisconsin Chapter Executive, American Red Cross, after a recent interview with Katie Phernetton, anchor at WQOW, an event sponsor.

The annual event celebrates local people who were involved in selfless acts of courage and kindness during the past year. The award breakfast also serves as a fundraising event for programs and services provided by the Northwest Wisconsin Chapter of the American Red Cross. (Click here to reserve your seat.)

Chosen across a handful of categories, honorees at the Heroes Breakfast represent those among us who reflect what is best in our communities. The 2020 Heroes are:

Josh Stendahl (Trempealeau County) – award: Adult Good Samaritan

Max Marsolek (Trempealeau County) – award: Youth Good Samaritan

Osseo Fire Department (Trempealeau County) – award: Community Heroes

Abby Droessler (Sawyer County) – award: From the Heart Hero

Barron County First Responders (Barron County) – award: Healthcare Heroes

Peter Hestekin (Eau Claire County) – award: Military Hero

Sharon Ammerman (St. Croix County) – award: Hero of a Lifetime

Sacred Heart Hospital is the premier sponsor of this very special event. Additional sponsors include Marshfield Clinic, WQOW TV-18, Bauer Built Inc., Royal Credit Union, Mayo Clinic Health Systems Eau Claire, Xcel Energy, Global Finishing Solutions, Westconsin Credit Union, Charter Bank, Group Health Cooperative of Eau Claire, M3 Insurance, Black River Memorial Hospital, BMO Harris and TTM Technologies.

Click here to purchase tickets or call (715) 271-8395. Reservations are $46 and all proceeds go toward the Northwest Wisconsin Chapter of the American Red Cross.

Hours After Smoke Alarm Installation, Oshkosh Couple Avoids the Worst

By Justin Kern, American Red Cross

Ross Golly’s hands spelled out words like “smoke,” “scared” and “alarm” in retelling the story of a recent cooking fire at his home. Golly and his wife, Betty, who are both deaf, escaped danger from that grease fire quickly thanks in part to alarms installed that very afternoon by the American Red Cross.

Betty and Ross Golly at home Dec 2019 ONE

Betty and Ross Golly, with their dogs Brownie and Peanut, at their Oshkosh home in December 2019. Smoke alarms from the Red Cross helped them avoid harm and destruction the same day they were installed.

As Ross signed the word “comfort” to share his feeling on the ultimate impact of these alarms, his fingers displayed faint, white scars from another fire six years ago that revealed how bad it could have been.

Gratitude and collaboration
The Sunday after Thanksgiving, a volunteer duo from the Red Cross were out in northeastern Wisconsin following up on appointments to install smoke alarms and work with families on home fire escape plans. The appointments are part of the Red Cross Home Fire Campaign, which has brought more than 2 million smoke alarms into homes across the U.S. since 2014. Closer to home, from July 2018 to June 2019, for all of Wisconsin, Red Cross volunteers and partners installed 5,709 alarms at nearly 2,500 homes.

More than alarms, the program has directly led to nearly 700 lives saved nationwide, including a family in Janesville. It’s that chance to help keep families prepared and safe from that most-common disaster of home fires that engaged Red Cross volunteers like Toby Vanden Heuvel and Kurt Hein.

Vanden Heuvel has been a volunteer with the disaster action team since 2007. In that role, he both responds to help families who have suffered a home fire and installs alarms to prevent major fires. Soon after the Green Bay Packers game on Sunday, Dec. 1, Vanden Heuvel and Hein visited the Gollys for their installation appointment, which Ross had made online. The four worked collaboratively to overcome initial communications challenges, and Vanden Heuvel said the installation stood out because of the positivity and gratitude.

Toby Vanden Heuvel in FDL floods winter 2019

Toby Vanden Heuvel volunteers with the disaster team, which includes smoke alarm installations and, as seen here, distribution of flood clean up supplies in Fond du Lac in 2019.

“They were super gracious. And interested, reading through all of the instructions” for the alarms and home fire escape plans, Vanden Heuvel said. “Everyone was helping everyone, in some form or fashion.”

Later that night, Hein received a TTY call from the Gollys. The alarms Hein and Vanden Heuvel installed that day went off just hours later, alerting the Gollys to a kitchen fire and preventing a bigger disaster.

Alarms in use, just hours later
In mid-December, the Gollys shared their story on the fire from their home to the Red Cross, including disaster volunteer Sue Bardonner, fluent in American Sign Language that she learned when her son became deaf due to illness more than 20 years ago.

Hours after the installation of two bed-shakers and other, connected 10-year lithium battery alarms in the Golly home, they all went off. Betty had started to fry chicken in their kitchen. She said she misjudged the heat level and the grease burned up quickly, sparking smoke and small flames. That smoke triggered the shaker alarm under the bedroom bed where Ross was resting, as well as the connected alert lights the couple has rigged throughout the home.

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The charred pan that set off the smoke alarms at the Golly home.

While Betty dashed out the front door to escape the smoke, Ross took a quick check of the fire, then grabbed a fire extinguisher from their garage. He put out the fire without greater incident. But not without a rollercoaster of emotions.

“I felt scared” to have the alarms go off, Ross Golly signed. Still, he said the Red Cross bed-shakers and other alarms make him feel “more comfortable. It helps a lot.”

Ross and Betty Golly are now counted among those who prevented greater catastrophe from a home fire because of the Red Cross Home Fire Campaign. It’s a catastrophe they know well.

‘Something is wrong, I have to go’
For 23 years, the Gollys have lived in a ranch-style home in Oshkosh. The last few years, they’ve shared the home with their two loving dogs, Brownie and Peanut, who respond to sign language commands – especially when it involves treats. Like any homeowners, Ross and Betty have dealt with risks from accidents or weather. (An emergency broadcast weather radio is always on in the home and is connected to a series of alert lights, just like the smoke alarms, doorbell and telephone. Red Cross volunteers also shared information on common regional extreme weather disasters like flooding during their December visit.)

Ross Golly with burned hands submitted

Ross with his bandaged hands from a previous home fire.

An emergency incident six years ago at the home still puts the couple in a panic. Ross said he was working in the garage when a small fire broke out and melted a coffee pot. In putting that fire out, Ross hurt his hands, though he was able to get off an emergency text to Betty. She rushed home and said she immediately feared bigger problems for Ross with injuries to his hands, his primary method of communication.

“I got a text and I told my boss something is wrong, I have to go,” she remembered. “I came home and saw him and said, ‘Oh my gosh, go to the E.R.’”

Back to the hospital together, Betty helped Ross to communicate at the E.R. In time, his hands healed, though the scars remain. And they were a reminder when he heard about free smoke alarms and fire escape plans on offer from the Red Cross. As he thought back about the fire that scalded his hands and the more recent one where they avoided big damage, Ross reiterated his appreciation to Red Cross volunteers and for the alarms: “Thank you, we’re happy to have this.”

Do you know someone who could use free smoke alarms installed in their home? Sign up today at GetASmokeAlarm.org. Interested in joining our home fire safety volunteer teams? Take the first step at redcross.org/volunteer.

 

Volunteer profile: wanderlust fuels Wood County resident’s Red Cross service

By Stephanie Burton, American Red Cross

When Diane Scheunemann retired from her 41-year career as a parts inventory specialist for a large heavy truck dealership in Marshfield, she didn’t know what she would do with her time. Pickle ball, curling and softball were a start. But she knew she needed something more.

That’s when she turned to the American Red Cross.

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Diane Scheunemann waits in a convoy of Red Cross emergency response vehicles ready to bring food and other items to families in need after Hurricane Michael. (Submitted photo)

“I asked myself what I like to do,” the long-time Wood County resident said. “I like to volunteer and travel. And, the Red offers both of those opportunities.”

Scheunemann contacted her local chapter and began taking in-person and online courses. Soon, she was preparing for her first deployment working as a pre-disaster mega shelter volunteer in anticipation of Hurricane Irma in 2017. Scheunemann and other Red Cross volunteers staffed a school-based shelter that was locked down while one of the worst hurricanes to hit Miami in decades stalled over the area.

“I didn’t know what to expect,” she admitted. “I was in awe of what had to be done.”


You can join our disaster volunteers in a number of ways. Click here for info and to sign up.


What had to be done, Scheunemann soon learned, ranged from driving an emergency response vehicle to sorting through thousands of donations the Red Cross receives after disaster strikes.

A self-described introvert, Scheunemann quickly learned how to best use her skills to make a maximum impact. Her wanderlust led her next to provide aid during and after the 2017 Sonoma County Wildfires. This time, her efforts were focused on canteening, preparing food at mealtimes, loading trucks and cleaning.

“It’s a devastating thing to see these houses and vineyards burned to the ground,” she said. But, she takes comfort in knowing that she can provide so much help during times of such life-altering devastation.

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Scheunemann, center, poses during a break from work helping families impacted by wildfires in California in 2019. (Submitted photo)

Scheunemann also traveled to serve those impacted by Hurricane Michael in Mexico Beach, Fla., and to the widespread Paradise Fire in Butte County, Calif.

Scheunemann credits her husband for making her deployments possible. He maintains the home and takes care of their dog while she’s away for each two-week deployment.

Her volunteer experience isn’t limited to deployments. In fact, her Red Cross colleagues describe Scheunemann as a jack-of-all trades. She has also responded to a number of local fires that have displaced families.

When asked about what’s touched her most about her time as a Red Cross volunteer, Scheunemann pointed to the generosity she saw in others, not herself. She recalled a local fire she responded to where, among those affected, were three young children, including a colicky baby. A fire chief also at the scene joined their work to help the family find shelter plus medicine for the baby.

You can put your compassion and talents to use as a volunteer with our disaster action teams. We are always looking for people to join our teams, starting with local homes fires and floods, and, with training and interest, deployed out to national catastrophes. Click here to start your volunteer journey.