Who’s Ready to Watch Some Football Tomorrow?

By: PaKou Lee, Social Media Intern

578386_655499837794299_2053414044_nThe Packers will be playing against the Detroit Lions at Ford Field starting at 11:30 a.m. I thought the last game against the Minnesota Vikings was pretty rough. I was nervous throughout the entire overtime play. My home state versus my favorite football team. Of course, the Packers are my favorite.

I was never into football before moving here to Green Bay. My friends and family finally converted me after nearly a year of living in Green Bay. The culture here is definitely different than back at home in St. Paul. Green Bay has a lot of community events involving the Packers, smaller organizations and businesses. It feels more personable to me. Back at home, there’s so much going on; the city is bigger, there is a lot more to do. I’m always on the fast lane that sometimes I forget about what my home state is all about. I definitely appreciate both cultures and states. Just spreading my Minnesota Nice to Green Bay.

I’m still trying to understand football. When I started watching the games, I had a ton of questions: What is an interception? Where is the ball? Once I even made a silly, but serious comment, “Wow! The Packers had a really good home run.” Of course, I know the difference between a home run and a touchdown. It just slipped out. It still makes my family laugh when someone brings it up, so there’s something good in that. I’ll be sporting my Packer gear tomorrow and cheering them on. I hope you and your family have a great time watching the Packer game or any of the other teams playing tomorrow. Stay warm if you’re going to be outside.

Be Prepared – Get the app

First Aid App logo

Whether you’re watching the game at home or playing your own football game in your backyard this Thanksgiving, be prepared to handle the most common first aid emergencies. Get your head in the game and download our First Aid mobile app on your iPhone or Android device.

Too Blessed to be Stressed.

By PaKou Lee, Social Media Intern

Everyday I count my blessings in my head. I think about all the things I’m thankful for right before I sleep. I remind myself to be thankful of all the little and big things I take for granted, like mandatory overtime at work, a stranger’s laugh and my family.

I am especially thankful for my sisters, sister-in-laws, and nieces for their wonderful cooking! I can never lose a pound even with all of the cardio that I do because I am always eating good. Not only that, but I am also not that great of a cook so I am extra thankful for their delicious food. The aroma of curry in the kitchen and just thinking about the spiciness of papaya salad makes my mouth water. You don’t even have to ask my family about my cooking. I already know the answer:

“She can cook the basic scramble eggs, noodles, and rice. She might get you fast food if you raise your hand when she asks who’s hungry.”

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My sister-in-law, Sunning’s, green bean casserole from last year’s Thanksgiving. I always look forward to this dish because it’s so good!

It’s always a joke to say that in my family, but hey I know they give me credit for helping them prep, set the table, and clean.

I haven’t done any cooking or baking this year yet, but last year I was baking chocolate chip cookies for my family in Minnesota. I baked roughly 4 dozens of cookies. For my third dozen, it took a little bit longer to bake. I had no idea why it was taking 20 minutes when the instructions said about 10-12 minutes. After I took the cookies out of the oven, the middle was still gooey and raw. I came to realize I had turned off the oven when I took out the second batch. Haha, whoops! I told my family that if they eat a cookie that taste funny, it means good luck. Just kidding! My family still loves me though. It’s the thought that counts.

Noodles topped with cilantro!

Noodles topped with cilantro!

This Thanksgiving, I’m in charge of the pies and sparkling juice! Easy as 1-2-3! Except, I’m going to take on a challenge! Making cheesecake pumpkin pie. No worries, my 18-year-old niece, Dystany, is going to help and supervise. The little ones Nevaeh, Kace, & Cienna will definitely be the taste testers and there’s always back up pumpkin pies at the grocery store too!

When life gets a little out of control, I remind myself:

“Too blessed to be stressed.”

A little quote to share with you this Thanksgiving year. Don’t forget to view our cooking and traveling safety tips also. I hope you all have a belly-too-full-to-move Thanksgiving with your family and loved ones! Safe travels & stay warm!

American Red Cross Offers Thanksgiving Cooking and Travel Tips

thansgivingMillions of Americans will be preparing meals and traveling throughout the Thanksgiving holiday weekend. The American Red Cross has safety tips for the kitchen and for the highway.

“More home cooking fires occur on Thanksgiving than on any other day of the year,” said Steve Hansen, Regional Chief Operating Officer. “The week of Thanksgiving is also one of the busiest travel periods. We want people to arrive at their destinations, enjoy time with their loved ones and make it home safely.”

COOKING SAFETY:  Cooking is the leading cause of home fires and related injuries. Follow these safety tips:

  • Keep children and pets at least three feet away from the cooking area.
  • Clean all cooking surfaces to prevent grease buildup.
  • Stay in the kitchen while frying, grilling or broiling food. Turn burners off if leaving the kitchen.
  • Keep a pan lid or baking sheet nearby. Use it to cover the pan if it catches on fire.
  • Place turkey fryers outside and away from the house, deck and garage.

TRAVEL SAFETY:  Vehicles should be in good working order before heading out. Remember to:

  • Pack emergency supplies like blankets, water and snacks, flashlight and first aid kit.
  • Fill the fuel tank, check air pressure in tires and top-off windshield fluid.
  • Buckle up and obey all traffic signs.
  • Avoid distractions while driving like using mobile phones to talk or text.
  • Designate a driver who won’t be drinking whenever alcohol is served.

holiday-safetyThe Red Cross has a variety of emergency supplies and first aid kits available at redcrossstore.org.

KNOW HOW TO TREAT EMERGENCIES: People can learn how to respond to emergencies by downloading the free American Red Cross First Aid App. Users receive instant access to expert advice whenever and wherever they need it. The app is available in the Apple App Store or the Google Play Store by searching for American Red Cross or by going to redcross.org/mobileapps.

Give the gift of life this Thanksgiving with blood donation

Red Cross to thank donors with pies at select Thanksgiving blood drives

As Thanksgiving approaches, many people reflect on their blessings and look for ways to give back to the community or someone less fortunate. Giving an hour of your time and donating blood could offer a hospital patient the most valuable gift of all – the gift of life. The American Red Cross is encouraging all eligible donors to donate blood. It’s the gift that doesn’t cost a thing and can offer another holiday season to someone in need.

Thanksgiving2The Red Cross will thank presenting donors Nov. 25-29 with a complimentary pie at select blood drives in Iowa and Wisconsin. As an added incentive during the week of Thanksgiving, all presenting donors will receive a red, commemorative Red Cross T-shirt, while supplies last.

“While the need for blood is ongoing, the supply isn’t – especially around the holidays,” said Greg Novinska, the Chief Executive Officer of the American Red Cross Badger-Hawkeye Blood Services Region. “Long holiday weekends pose an extra challenge, when many donors are traveling to be with family and friends. Without the generosity of volunteer blood donors, we would not be able to ensure a stable blood supply for patients in need.”

Upcoming blood donation opportunities in Northeast Wisconsin:

  • Nov. 25-27 from 1-6 p.m. at American Red Cross Green Bay Blood Donation Center, 2131 Deckner Ave. in Green Bay.
  • Nov. 27 from 12:30-5 p.m. at Saint Francis Xaviers Parish at 220 S. Michigan St. in De Pere.
  • Nov. 29 from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Pilgrim Congregational Church, 991 Pilgrim Way in Green Bay.

Thanksgiving-Pie

How to donate blood

Simply call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental consent in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

Red Cross Offers Cooking Safety Tips For Thanksgiving Chefs

Cooking Leading Cause of Home Fires

Thanksgiving is all about food and family – turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes, pumpkin pie and family time. However, preparing holiday goodies can lead to disaster – the kitchen is the setting of more fires than any other room in the house, and cooking is the leading cause of fires in the home. The American Red Cross has safety steps to use while preparing the Thanksgiving feast. 

The Red Cross wants folks to have a safe holiday and the following will help avoid ruining the holiday with a cooking fire.

The cooks should start by not wearing loose clothing or dangling sleeves while cooking. Never leave cooking food unattended – stay in the kitchen when frying, grilling or broiling food. If someone must leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, they should turn-off the stove. Other safety steps include:

  • Check food regularly while cooking and remain in the home while cooking. Use a timer as a reminder that the stove or oven is on.
  • Keep the kids away from the cooking area. Enforce a “kid-free zone” and make them stay at least three feet away from the stove.
  • Keep anything that can catch fire – pot holders, oven mitts, wooden utensils, paper or plastic bags, food packaging, and towels or curtains—away from the stove, oven or any other appliance in the kitchen that generates heat.
  • Clean cooking surfaces on a regular basis to prevent grease buildup.
  • Purchase a fire extinguisher to keep in the kitchen. Contact the local fire department to take training on the proper use of extinguishers.
  • Always check the kitchen before going to bed or leaving the home to make sure all stoves, ovens, and small appliances are turned off.
  • Install a smoke alarm near the kitchen, on each level of the home, near sleeping areas, and inside and outside bedrooms. Use the test button to check it each month. Replace all batteries at least once a year.

Another helpful step is to download the Red Cross First Aid app which puts expert advice for everyday emergencies in someone’s hand. Available for iPhone and Android devices, the official Red Cross First Aid app gives instant access to the information needed to handle the most common first aid emergencies. With videos, interactive quizzes and simple step-by-step advice it’s never been easier to know first aid.

House fires are the worst disaster threat to families in the United States. To learn how to prevent a fire in the home and how to keep members of the household safe, people can download The Red Cross Fire Prevention and Safety Checklist.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

Don’t Let Your Thanksgiving Flame Out

Take a Red Cross quiz to see if your cooking safety knowledge is up to snuff!

If you’re responsible for cooking Thanksgiving dinner, you know how hectic it can be. The last thing you need on the big day is a kitchen disaster, so take our quiz to make sure your holiday stays safe (and delicious!).

1. What is the #1 cause of home fires in the U.S.?

a. Cooking

b. Space heaters

c. Electrical malfunctions

2. What is the primary cause of cooking fires in the home?

a. Using too many stove burners at once

b. Unattended cooking

c. Misbehaving pets

3. If you’re frying, grilling or broiling food, you should…

a. Stay in your home and check on the food regularly.

b. Feel free to go outside. Just check on the food from time to time.

c. Stay in the kitchen the entire time.

4. If you’re simmering, boiling, baking or roasting food, you should…

a. Stay in the kitchen the entire time.

b. Stay in your home, check the food regularly and use a timer to remind you that you’re cooking.

c. Feel free to leave the home, but only for short errands.

5. When you’re cooking, how far should kids stay away from the stove?

a. At least 3 feet

b. At least 6 feet

c. It’s ok for kids to be close to the stove, as long as they follow directions. 

6. If a fire starts in a pan while you’re cooking, what should you do?

a. Move the pan off the stove.

b. Beat the fire with a towel.

c. Slide a lid over the burning pan and turn off the burner.

7. Which of the following are ok to keep on the stovetop?

a. Potholders and paper towels

b. Dish towels and wooden utensils

c. Paper towels and wooden utensils

d. None of the above

How did you do?

0-2 correct: Don’t put your apron on just yet. Read our cooking safety tips first!

3-6 correct: You’re getting warmer—study up on cooking safety and you’ll be frying and roasting before you know it.

All 7 correct: Great job! You’re ready to whip up an unforgettable meal. You can never be too prepared, so check out our section on fire safety and other tips.

 Answers: 1. a; 2. b; 3. c; 4. b; 5. a; 6. c; 7. d

 

Keep Your Thanksgiving Fire-Free

Dry turkey. Watery mashed potatoes. Family feuds. Beyond these holiday “hazards,” what makes the most trouble over Thanksgiving is a real hazard: cooking fires.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, cooking is the leading cause of home fires and home fire injuries. Unfortunately, Thanksgiving is prime time for these accidents, since many people break out the pots and pans for the holiday.

To keep your Thanksgiving safe and fire-free, follow these tips.

Mind your pan

  • Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen even for a short period of time, turn off the stove. Unattended cooking causes nearly 90 percent of all kitchen fires.
  • If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you’re cooking.
  • Be alert. You won’t be alert if you are sleepy, have taken medicine or drugs, or consumed alcohol that makes you drowsy.

Keep it clear

  • Keep anything that can catch fire—potholders, wooden utensils, food wrappers, towels or curtains—away from your stove top.
  • Make sure your sleeves are out of the way when cooking. Wear tighter fitting clothing with shorter sleeves. 

Kids and pets

  • Have a “kid-free zone” of at least 3 feet around the stove and areas where hot food or drink is prepared or carried.
  • Never hold a child while cooking, drinking or carrying hot foods or liquids.
  • Turn the handles of pots and pans on the stove inward to avoid accidents.
  • Keep pets off cooking surfaces and nearby countertops to prevent them from knocking things onto the burner.
Keep your Thanksgiving safe and fire-free

Fire prevention isn’t just for the holidays, though. To keep you and your family safe, it’s important to follow some safety tips year-round.

  • Keep items that can catch on fire at least three feet away from anything that gets hot, such as space heaters.
  • Never smoke in bed.
  • Talk to children regularly about the dangers of fire, matches and lighters and keep them out of reach.
  • Turn portable heaters off when you leave the room or go to sleep.

Smoke Alarms Save Lives
Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, inside bedrooms and outside sleeping areas. Check monthly that smoke alarms are working properly by pushing the test button.

At least once a year, replace the batteries in your smoke alarms; every 10 years, replace the entire smoke alarm.  

Make a Fire Escape Plan
If the unthinkable does happen, you want to make sure you’re prepared. Sit down with your family and make a fire escape plan:

  • Make sure all household members know two ways to escape from every room of your home.
  • Decide where you will meet outside in case of fire.
  • Practice escaping from your home at least twice a year and at different times of the day. Practice waking up to smoke alarms, low crawling and meeting outside. Make sure everyone knows how to call 9-1-1.
  • Teach household members to STOP, DROP and ROLL if their clothes should catch on fire.

Read more about fire safety and prevention at Redcross.org.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation’s blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.