A Work of Heart

*Permission to republish by StateFarm.com. (Originanly published on http://goodneighbors.com/post/126421892122/heart)

A Work of Heart We all know that nursing isn’t easy. But, seeing patients recover and thrive makes it all worth it. Most people may not remember or connect with their doctors or other staff like they do a nurse or Certified Nursing Assistant. Because let’s face it, they are the heart of healthcare. The empathy and care they provide to patients helps encourage strength and recovery. It takes special people to see people at their worst, most difficult time and support them on their course to getting healthy and enjoying a great quality of life. [[MORE]] The job opportunities also provide a great quality of life for those who purse these careers. Christopher Strickland, a 52 year-old father, who was laid off as a cook at a local pub, realized this job path could create stability and help him earn a better income. He was experiencing difficulty finding steady employment and wanted to work in a field where there’s a need. It was happenstance that he came across an ad in the newspaper about the Red Cross Nurse Assistant Training (NAT) program and the chance to receive a scholarship to complete the training. He decided to apply and was awarded a State Farm® scholarship to achieve his goals. Christopher quickly realized through his training that nursing was the right fit for this next step in his career journey. His charisma and sense of humor went over famously with the residents at a nursing home where students perform their clinicals. Residents developed meaningful relationships with Christopher, and it helped them feel comfortable being in their most vulnerable state. As Christopher shared excitement for his new opportunity, his son, Ali, took notice that nursing is a field that will always have a need for qualified individuals. Ali, a 23 year-old young man didn’t have a job at the time and wanted to find something that would provide a decent salary. He decided to follow in his father’s footsteps, applied and was awarded a State Farm scholarship to complete his training. NAT Coordinator Tanya Christensen shared, “Nursing has always been a field dominated by women, but more patients are wanting to have a choice as to whether a man or woman takes care of them. In addition, people who are further along in their careers are realizing nursing could be a great next career step since the healthcare sector continues to add jobs and that the unemployment rate is low. With all these reasons, why wouldn’t someone pursue this rewarding career path.” Lucikly, there’s still time to apply for scholarships and participate in training sessions provided by the Red Cross. Day and evening classes are taking place in Green Bay, La Crosse and Waupaca. Check out the Red Cross NAT website for more details!

We all know that nursing isn’t easy. But, seeing patients recover and thrive makes it all worth it. Most people may not remember or connect with their doctors or other staff like they do a nurse or Certified Nursing Assistant. Because let’s face it, they are the heart of healthcare. The empathy and care they provide to patients helps encourage strength and recovery. It takes special people to see people at their worst, most difficult time and support them on their course to getting healthy and enjoying a great quality of life.

The job opportunities also provide a great quality of life for those who purse these careers. Christopher Strickland, a 52 year-old father, who was laid off as a cook at a local pub, realized this job path could create stability and help him earn a better income. He was experiencing difficulty finding steady employment and wanted to work in a field where there’s a need. It was happenstance that he came across an ad in the newspaper about the Red Cross Nurse Assistant Training (NAT) program and the chance to receive a scholarship to complete the training. He decided to apply and was awarded a State Farm® scholarship to achieve his goals.

Christopher quickly realized through his training that nursing was the right fit for this next step in his career journey. His charisma and sense of humor went over famously with the residents at a nursing home where students perform their clinicals. Residents developed meaningful relationships with Christopher, and it helped them feel comfortable being in their most vulnerable state.

father and son

As Christopher shared excitement for his new opportunity, his son, Ali, took notice that nursing is a field that will always have a need for qualified individuals. Ali, a 23 year-old young man didn’t have a job at the time and wanted to find something that would provide a decent salary. He decided to follow in his father’s footsteps, applied and was awarded a State Farm scholarship to complete his training.

ali just graduated

NAT Coordinator Tanya Christensen shared, “Nursing has always been a field dominated by women, but more patients are wanting to have a choice as to whether a man or woman takes care of them. In addition, people who are further along in their careers are realizing nursing could be a great next career step since the healthcare sector continues to add jobs and that the unemployment rate is low. With all these reasons, why wouldn’t someone pursue this rewarding career path.”

Lucikly, there’s still time to apply for scholarships and participate in training sessions provided by the Red Cross. Day and evening classes are taking place in Green Bay, La Crosse and Waupaca. Check out the Red Cross NAT website for more details!

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Red Cross NAT Training Changes Lives

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Andrea Johnson’s Red Cross NAT training offered her new opportunities.

The American Red Cross is a premier provider of Nurse Assistant Training, preparing students to play an important part in today’s health care.

Nurse Assistants learn to provide quality care for residents in long-term care facilities, hospitals, home health care and hospice settings. The Red Cross program is designed with input from educators, caregivers and industry representatives from across the United States.

Andrea Johnson, Wisconsin, is a nursing assistant at an assisted living facility where she spends her days tending to the basic needs of her patients. She gathers vital information about her patients’ conditions that she shares with her nurse supervisor. The ability to use her skills to help those in need in a career with full benefits is motivating and rewarding.

Johnson trained as a nurse assistant through the Red Cross. She found out about the Red Cross Nurse Assistant Training (NAT) program and the scholarships that were available. She applied, was accepted into the program and received a scholarship from State Farm, which was a significant turning point for her. The knowledge gained and training received provided her access to new opportunities.

“My entire life changed,” Johnson said. “I had the great opportunity to meet Sarah, my instructor. Her sensitivity, care, responsibility and respect made me the professional woman I am now.”

PROGRAM DETAILS Day classes are available and students learn the nationally developed curriculum in a hands-on environment. The training meets or exceeds state standards. Through lectures, DVDs, role playing and laboratory practice, students learn skills such as vital signs, bathing, dressing and positioning. Graduates are prepared to pass state tests and be successfully employed. Training requirements for the Certified Nurse Assistant varies from state to state. For more details, including how to register for training, visit the Training and Certification information on this web site.

STATE FARM SCHOLARSHIP State Farm® has awarded a $15,000 grant to fund scholarships for the Nurse Assistant Training Program being offered by the American Red Cross in three Wisconsin communities. The program and the scholarships will be available in Green Bay, La Crosse and Altoona. The nurse assistant training is part of the health care training programs offered by the Red Cross.

For more details and to apply, please click here.

Tribute to the Red Cross Nursing Pin

Marion Eastwood No. 226482 Red Cross Nurse.

Marion Eastwood No. 226482 Red Cross Nurse.

By Jody Weyers, Volunteer and Communications Director.

The image of the Red Cross Nurse has been part of our Red Cross brand, imagery and history for more than 100 years.  I never realized the formality and the regulations that went along with wearing the uniform until last week….

I was in my office, when a past volunteer, Darryl, stopped by and he was wondering if I could help him with a request. He was visiting friends in Minnesota, and Lillian, who was in her 90’s, knew that Darryl volunteered with the Red Cross. She was telling him how she had the nursing pin of her dear friend Marion Eastwood, of Gowanda, NY who had passed away. She asked Darryl if he could help her return the pin to the Red Cross because that was the directive given to nurses who received the “badge”.

Darryl asked me if I could find out who it should be returned to. Of course, I said I would find out what to do with it.

Regulations for Wearing the Badge of the Red Cross Nursing Service

Regulations for Wearing the Badge of the Red Cross Nursing Service

I first contacted Mary Kellam, Associate, Nursing & Health, in Washington DC. She told me that it has indeed been tradition for nurses to return their American Red Cross RN pins (formerly called badges) to the American Red Cross upon their passing. She also attached for me the regulations nurses receive upon being issued their “badge”.

In doing additional research on the internet, I also came across how the badge came about:

The Nurse Badge (pin) was adopted and first ordered in 1906, in a design derived from the American Medical Association pin, with the addition of the laurel wreath on the outer edge.  Numbering of the badges did not begin until 1909.

Since that time until present, each nurse enrolled as a Red Cross nurse receives a numbered badge and enrollment card, and the regulations for wearing the badge or the American Red Cross Nursing Service.  The badge and card always remain the property of the American Red Cross, protected by an Act of Congress.  The badge must not be worn by any other person than the person to whom it is issued.  There are clear regulations for the disposition of badges at the end of the nurse’s enrollment.  The nurse, relative, or administrator of the estate, should return the badge to National Headquarters, or the nurse may choose to be buried with the badge.

I am happy to say Marion Eastwood’s badge No. 226482 is now safely back where it belongs.

American Red Cross Announces Fall/Winter Nurse Assistant Training Schedule

The purpose of the American Red Cross Nurse Assistant Training course is to provide the information and skills that will enable nurse assistants to provide quality care for residents in nursing homes, as well as supplemental information and skills that will enable them to provide quality health care for clients at home and patients in hospitals. The program is designed with input from educators, caregivers, and long-term industry representatives from across the United States.  The American Red Cross Nurse Assistant Training course is approved by the State of Wisconsin Department of Health Services and provides students with job skills needed to become a qualified CNA.

The American Red Cross Lakeland Chapter is accepting applications for upcoming nurse assistant training classes.

COURSE DATES/TIMES MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Classroom: 5:00-9:30pm on Mon, Tue, Thu and 8:00am-1:30 or 2:00pm on Sat; Oct 18, 19, 21, 23, 25, 26, 28, 30, Nov 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 15, 16, 18, and Nov 20 (make-up day 8am-2:00pm)

1st Group Clinical: 5:00-10:00pm, Mon, Tue, Thu, Nov 29, 30, Dec 2; 7:00am-3:30pm, Sat, Dec 4; 5:00-10:00pm, Mon, Dec 6 and 5:00-9:00, Tue, Dec

 2nd Group Clinical: 5:00-10pm, Thu, Dec 9; 7:00am-3:30pm, Sat, Dec 11; 5:00-10:00pm, Mon, Tue, Wed, Dec 13, 14, 15; and 5:00-9:00, Thu, Dec 16

Classroom: 8:00am-2:00pm; Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Oct 19, 20, 21, 22; Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Oct 25, 26, 27, 28; Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Nov 1, 2, 3, 4, 5; Mon, Tue, Wed, Nov 8, 9, 10 and Thu, Nov 11 (make up day)

 1st Group Clinical: 7:00am-3:30pm; Fri, Mon, Tue, Thu, Nov 12, 15, 16, 18

 2nd Group Clinical: 7:00am-3:30pm; Fri, Mon, Tue, Wed, Nov 19, 22, 23, 24

Classroom: 8:00am-3:30pm; Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Dec 20, 21, 22, 23, 27, 28, 29, 30, Jan, 3, 4, 5, 6; 8:00am-12:00pm, Fri Jan 7; and 8:00am-3:30pm, Mon, Jan 10 (make-up day)

 1st Group Clinical: 7:00am-3:30pm, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Jan, 11, 12, 13, 14

 2nd Group Clinical: 7:00am-3:30pm, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Jan, 17, 18, 19, 20

 The Nurse Assistant Training course is scheduled for a total of 120 hours which includes 88 hours of classroom and 32 hours of clinical. Students are required to attend the minimum 120 hours as required by the state.  The course fee is $750 which includes the books.  Minimum class size is 5 students.  Enrollment is limited to 16 students per class.  Early registration is encouraged. 

Classroom work is completed at the American Red Cross Lakeland Chapter Service Delivery Facility at 121 Bader St., Green Bay. Clinicals are completed at Parkview Manor Health & Rehab, 2961 St. Anthony Dr., Green Bay. For copies of the training program registration packet, please call the Health and Safety Services Department at 920-227-4290 or 1-800-733-9909 or pick up a registration packet from the department at 2131 Deckner Ave  (lower level) Monday-Friday, 8am-4:30pm.

 About the American Red Cross:The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation’s blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

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