Hurricane Matthew – WI Responds

Hurricane Matthew. Thousands of people in shelters. Thousands of relief workers responding. Too many lives lost. This disaster is a big one, for all of us, requiring many hands, heads, and hearts pulling together to help others in dire need. Shelter, food, and relief supplies are American Red Cross priorities.

Blood and platelet donations are needed from people in unaffected areas to make up for canceled drives. Check out the stories below. They’ll show you how the Red Cross is helping.

You Just Gotta Be Strong: a video from the American Red Cross features Terry, a shelter resident who was forced to evacuate his home in Tarboro, North Carolina, because of Hurricane Matthew

Haiti Needs Help from All of Usan opinion piece from American Red Cross CEO Gail McGovern published in Huffington Post addresses rumors, issues, and concerns about disaster relief responses in Haiti. False information shared on the internet hurts people who need our help the most

Suffering Continues After Hurricane Matthew: a news release from the American Red Cross with details about how the Red Cross is responding to the disaster in the U.S. and in Haiti

From Wisconsin, there are more than 80 Red Cross relief workers deployed to help in the affected areas. More will likely be on their way in the days to come.

jim-gerry-gilmore-kevin-lori-peterson

Lori and Kevin Peterson and Gerry and Jim Gilmore drove their Emergency Response Vehicles from Wisconsin and are serving thousands of meals, water and distributing cleaning supplies to residents in the hardest hit areas.  

Please support this relief effort. Click here to donate money to Red Cross disaster relief. Click here to make a blood or platelet donation appointment.

Thank you!

Red Cross Launches Huge Tornado Relief Response

Shelters open in 11 states to help people in the path of the storms

The American Red Crosshas launched a large relief operation across 11 states to help people affected by yesterday’s devastating tornado outbreak in the South and Midwest. Weather experts reported as many as 95 confirmed tornadoes touched down, destroying communities from the Great Lakes to the Southeast.

Harrisburg, IL resident, Cindy Fark, receives a hug from a Red Cross Disaster volunteer, Ann Corbin after describing the tornado coming through her neighborhood. Photo Credit: Tammie Pech/American Red Cross

“Our hearts go out to everyone who has been affected by this week’s severe storms,” said Charley Shimanski, senior vice president, Disaster Services. “Our top priorities right now are making sure people have a safe place to stay, a warm meal and a shoulder to lean on as they begin to clean up their neighborhoods. The Red Cross is also working closely with our government and community partners to make sure everyone gets the help they need.”Friday night, the Red Cross opened or supported 22 shelters in Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Oklahoma, North Carolina, Alabama, Indiana, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. Across the affected states, trained Red Cross disaster workers are mobilizing to begin feeding operations and distribution of relief supplies. Red Cross health services and mental health workers also will be out in neighborhoods help people cope with what they’ve seen and experienced. And damage assessment teams will also help the Red Cross and our partners discover the full scope of the damage.

If someone would like to help people affected by disasters like tornadoes and floods, they can make a donation to support American Red Cross Disaster Relief by visiting http://www.redcross.org, calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or texting the word REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. Contributions may also be sent to their local Red Cross chapter or to the American Red Cross, P.O. Box 37243, Washington, DC 20013.

Locate a shelter. People can find Red Cross shelters by contacting local emergency officials, visiting www.redcross.org, or calling 1-800-REDCROSS (1-800-733-2767). iPhone users can download a free Red Cross shelter view app from the app store.

Those affected can let loved ones know they are safe by registering on the secure Red Cross Safe and Well website, where they can also update their Facebook and Twitter status. If you don’t have computer access, you can also register by calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). Loved ones outside the disaster area can use Safe and Well to find information about loved ones in the affected areas by using a pre-disaster phone number or complete address. Smart phone users can visit www.redcross.org/safeandwell and click on the “List Yourself as Safe and Well” or “Search for friends and family” link.

Follow safety steps. As people begin to deal with the aftermath of the tornadoes, the Red Cross reminds people they should return to their neighborhood only when officials say it is safe to do so. They should also:

  • Stay out of damaged buildings and immediately report any fallen power lines or broken gas lines to the utility companies.
  • Use flashlights, not candles when examining buildings. If someone smells gas or hears a hissing noise, they should open a window, get everyone out of the building immediately and call the gas company or fire department.

More tornado safety information is available on the Preparedness Section of the Red Cross website.

You can help people affected by disasters like floods and tornadoes, as well as countless crises at home and around the world, by making a donation to support American Red Cross Disaster Relief. Your gift enables the Red Cross to prepare for and provide shelter, food, emotional support and other assistance in response to disasters. Visit http://www.redcross.org or call 1-800-RED-CROSS. Contributions may also be sent to your local American Red Cross chapter or to the American Red Cross, P.O. Box 37243, Washington, DC 20013.

Hurricane Irene – North Carolina Update

Barbara Behling Shares her Red Cross Deployment Experience

By Barbara Behling, regional community development officer for the Amercan Red Cross Northeast Wisconsin

Flag flies at Lowes store in Sanford.N.C. Amazing no one was hurt.

On Sunday, April 17th I was deployed to support North Carolina as a string of deadly tornadoes had ravaged the state. As a member of the Advanced Public Affairs Team, we are responsible for the early communications between local communities, affected chapters, emergency management and national media.

This disaster presented several challenges. No mercy was shown on several counties; more than twenty people were killed, hundreds of home destroyed, thousands damaged, and the scope of involvement from all partners (Red Cross, FEMA, Southern Baptist, Search & Rescue, Salvation Army, Tide Loads of Hope, etc) was immense.

More than a dozen shelters were established for temporary housing. In each, we coordinated “I’m safe and well” messages to families frantically searching for their loved ones. We provided a warm place to sleep, showers, hot food, snack, activities for the kids (this included an Easter Basket delivery made by local school group, with financial support from a local business). Most of all, we provided a respite of silence, support and hope.

My two favorite “safe and well” connections were regarding a 91-year old grandmother and her family out of state. On an even larger scale, we reconnected a military family near Fort Bragg with her deployed husband in Kuwait via assistance from their Puerto Rican family and the Puerto Rican Red Cross.

Our Counseling teams were working one-on-one with families who lost a loved one in the storms. They listened, supported funeral arrangements, encouraged the grieving process to continue, they cried and hugged each family member left behind. 

In neighborhoods, our damage assessment teams were recording the storms carnage so that we could provide additional financial assistance to storm victims. Each families needs are different and through the client casework process, we listened, documented and supported emergency basic needs.

Partnerships which were well established and those that “popped-out” of the blue were heart-warming. The Tides Loads of Hope cloth washing service was activated in two communities. The Southern Baptists were cooking food and our emergency vehicles delivered it door-to-door. The media was consummate partner, they ran stories of where people could stay, what emergency numbers to call, hosted telethons and more.

While Mother Nature wrath of destruction was at her worst. The people of North Carolina were at their best. It’s this collective spirit that will prevail.

Local Red Cross volunteer

April 21, 2011
By NIKKI YOUNK – Staff Writer , The Daily News, nyounk@ironmountaindailynews.com
 

IRON MOUNTAIN – An Iron Mountain man is continuing his many years of service through the American Red Cross by volunteering for the tornado relief operation in North Carolina.

Vic Seppi departed on Wednesday for Raleigh, N.C. He will spend the next three weeks working as a warehouse supervisor.

“Vic will be responsible for helping manage supplies and other resources in a Red Cross warehouse where supplies will be coming in and going out to help those affected,” explained Nick Clippert, emergency services manager for the East Central Wisconsin chapter of the Red Cross.

This type of work is not new to Seppi. He has been volunteering with the Red Cross since he retired as the Sagola postmaster in 1998.

Seppi estimated that he has gone on 25 different relief assignments across the country in that time period. His resume includes volunteer work at ground zero after the World Trade Center attacks and in the Gulf Coast region after Hurricane Katrina.

Although the work can be intense at times, Seppi said that he enjoys volunteering over and over again.

“I’m just happy to go out on a relief operation again and be able to help people in need,” said Seppi.

Anyone interested in becoming an American Red Cross volunteer can stop by the Iron Mountain office at 427 S. Stephenson Avenue or call 774-2494.

American Red Cross Deploys Third Local Worker to assist with Southern Tornadoes

Marquizia Winston enjoys a sandwich at the American Red Cross shelter at the Garner United Methodist Church in Garner, N.C. Photo: Daniel Cima/American Red Cross

American Red Cross volunteer, Vic Seppi, from Iron Mountain, will be deploying to Raleigh, NC today to assist the relief operation for those affected by deadly tornadoes in the North Carolina area last weekend. He will be assisting in logistics as a Warehousing Supervisor. Vic will obtain his specific assignment and location once he lands inRaleigh,NC.  

“Vic will be responsible for helping manage supplies and other resources in a Red Cross warehouse where supplies will be coming in and going out to help those affected,” said Nick Clippert, Emergency Services Manager, East Central WI Chapter. “This will be one of many deployments for Vic who loves to go out and help people in any way he can.  It is great to know that we have wonderful volunteers like Vic in our area to help out when there is a need.” 

Vic has gone out on over 15 national disaster assignment including floods, wildfires, tornadoes, hurricanes, he has seen it all. “I am just happy to go out on a relief operation again and be able to help people that are in need,” said Vic Seppi. He has been a local volunteer with the Red Cross since 1998.

Vic is the third local Red Cross person to be deployed to help with the Southern Tornadoes. Earlier today, Tom Powell will deploy to Jackson, MSto assist as a mental health supervisor. Sunday, April17, Barbara Behling, regional community development officer for the American Red Cross Northeast Wisconsin, arrived inRaleigh,NC. She is working with the Red Cross Public Affairs Team.

The Red Cross depends on financial donations to help people affected by disasters like these tornadoes and wildfires. You can help by making a donation to support American Red Cross Disaster Relief. Visit http://www.redcross.org, call 1-800-RED CROSS or text the word REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. Contributions may also be sent to your local American Red Cross chapter or to the American Red Cross,P.O. Box 37243,Washington,DC20013.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation’s blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

Red Cross Responds After Tornadoes, Wildfires Leave Devastation Across The South

Editorial note: Call (202) 303-5551 to speak with an American Red Cross spokesperson on the groundVisit the Red Cross Disaster Online Newsroom for response information, including photos, audio, and press releases.

Residents wait to receive meals from an Emergency Response Vehicle in Raleigh, NC.

 WASHINGTON, April 18, 2011 – The American Red Cross is working around the clock to provide relief to people affected by the deadly tornadoes and scorching wildfires that left a path of destruction in six states across the south over the weekend.

Strong tornadoes ripped homes off their foundations, destroyed businesses and schools, overturned cars and buses, uprooted trees and downed power lines in Oklahoma, Virginia, North Carolina, Alabama, Arkansas and Mississippi. In North Carolina alone, preliminary disaster assessments show almost 500 homes destroyed and more than 1,000 damaged. Some of the hardest hit areas are still inaccessible, and officials say that many more than 1,000 families will be homeless in the state.

Red Cross workers sheltered more than 500 people over the weekend, served meals throughout the affected neighborhoods, and provided personal hygiene items and supplies to help as the clean-up begins. With government officials reporting more than 40 deaths from the tornadoes, Red Cross disaster mental health workers are available to help people cope with the aftermath. Red Cross chapters throughout the south are deploying trained disaster teams into the area and more than 25 Red Cross emergency response vehicles are in hard-hitNorth Carolina, or on their way to the state.

Red Cross workers make their way through devastated neighborhoods throughout West Texas. Photo Credit: Phil Beckman/American Red Cross

In Texas, wildfires have spread across more than 700,000 acres, destroying homes and forcing people to leave their neighborhoods. Red Cross disaster workers have opened shelters and are feeding those displaced by the fires. As families return to their neighborhoods, Red Cross teams are providing them with food and water. The Red Cross is also assisting those who have lost their homes to the fires, providing them with food, clothing and other necessities.

“Families have lost everything, and we are doing what we can to help them as they figure out what’s next,” said Charley Shimanski, senior vice president, Red Cross Disaster Services. “We’ll continue to help them in the weeks ahead as they try to get back on their feet.”

Since the end of March, the Red Cross has offered relief to people affected by 35 disasters in 20 states. The Red Cross is able to respond quickly with the help of corporations who are members of the organization’s Annual Disaster Giving Program (ADGP). ADGP members pledge donations on an ongoing basis to allow the Red Cross to pre-position supplies and be ready to take immediate action when disasters occur.

ADGP members include 3M, Altria, Aon, Cisco Foundation, ConAgra Foods, Darden Restaurants, Inc., Dr Pepper Snapple Group, FedEx Corporation, GE Foundation, The Home Depot Foundation, John Deere Foundation, Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Kraft Foods, Lowe’s Companies, Inc., Merck, Morgan Stanley, Nationwide Insurance Foundation,  Northrop Grumman, Ryder Charitable Foundation, Southwest Airlines, State Farm, State Street Foundation, Target,  The TJX Companies, Inc., UnitedHealthcare, UPS and Walmart.

 The Red Cross depends on financial donations to help people affected by disasters like these tornadoes and wildfires. You can help by making a donation to support American Red Cross Disaster Relief. Visit http://www.redcross.org, call 1-800-RED CROSS or text the word REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. Contributions may also be sent to your local American Red Cross chapter or to the American Red Cross,P.O. Box 37243,Washington,DC20013.

 About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation’s blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.