It’s National Fire Prevention Week

cooking fireThe theme of this year’s National Fire Prevention Week is “Prevent Kitchen Fires” and the American Red Cross has steps people can follow to avoid fires while cooking.

The Red Cross responds to a fire in someone’s home about every eight minutes and cooking is the number one cause of these fires in the United States.

KEEP AN EYE ON WHAT YOU FRY The cook should not wear loose clothing or dangling sleeves while cooking. They should also stay in the kitchen and never leave cooking food unattended. If they must leave the kitchen, for even a short period of time, they should turn off the stove.

Other ways to avoid cooking fires include the following:

  • Fires can start when the heat is too high. When frying food, if the cook sees smoke or the grease starts to boil, turn the burner off.
  • Keep children and pets at least three feet away from the stove.
  • Clean and clear the area around the stove before turning on the heat.
  • Turn pot handles to the back of the stove so no one bumps them or pulls them over.
  • Move things that can burn away from the stove – items such as dishtowels, bags, boxes, paper and curtains.
  • Keep a pan lid or a cookie sheet nearby. Use it to cover the pan if it catches on fire. This will put out the fire.

THE PAN IS ON FIRE If the pan catches fire, don’t move it. Slide a pan lid or cookie sheet on top of the pan to take the air away and put the fire out. Turn off the heat. Keep the lid on the pan until it cools. Never try to stop a grease or oil fire with water – it will only make the fire bigger.

OVEN, MICROWAVE FIRES If something catches fire in the oven, keep the door closed. Call 9-1-1 so firefighters can make sure the fire didn’t spread to the walls. If a fire occurs in the microwave, keep the door closed and unplug the microwave if you can. Don’t use it until a repairman checks it.

STOP, DROP AND ROLL If a fire occurs and someone’s clothes are on fire, they should stop where they are immediately, drop to the floor, cover their face with their hands and roll over and over to suffocate the flames. Keep doing it until the fire is out.

JUST GET OUT Leave the home and call the fire department from outside. Make sure everyone in the home gets out – fast. Once outside, stay out. Never go back inside a burning building.

MAKE A PLAN The Red Cross recommends that households develop a fire escape plan and practice it at least twice a year with everyone who lives in the home. People should know two ways to escape from every room and designate a place to meet outside the home in case of a fire.

Other safety steps include:

  • Follow the escape plan in case of fire. Get out, stay out, and call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number.
  • Install smoke alarms on every level of the house and inside bedrooms.
  • Replace batteries in smoke alarms at least once a year. Test each alarm monthly by pushing the test button.

American Red Cross Fire Safety Tips Help to Save Lives

Install Smoke Alarms and Create a Fire Escape Plan

This October 7-13 the American Red Cross is helping families and businesses learn how to protect themselves and others from fires in observance of National Fire Prevention Week. Last year, the Red Cross responded to about 63,000 home fires across the country by providing comfort and basic necessities to more than 82,000 families.

“We respond to about one home fire every nine minutes across the country. The best thing you can do to protect your loved ones is to install a smoke alarm and  develop and practice a fire escape plan,” said Steve Hansen, Chapter Executive,“Fires can spread very quickly, so everyone at home, school and work should know what to do when they hear the sound of a smoke alarm.”

 Additional recommendations include:

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of the house and inside bedrooms.
  • Replace batteries in smoke alarms at least once a year. Test each alarm monthly by pushing the test button.
  • Ensure that household members know two ways to escape from every room and designate a place to meet outside of your house in case of a fire. Practice your plan at least twice a year.
  • Follow your escape plan in case of fire. Get out, stay out, and call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number.
  • Download the American Red Cross First Aid App to get access to life-saving information on what to do for common, everyday first aid emergencies. The app is available in the Apple App Store and on Google Play for Android.

Visit www.redcross.org/homefires for additional fire safety tips. 

Business, too, should be prepared. Fire is the most common of all business disasters. According to the United State Fire Association, non-residential building fires resulted in $2.4 billion in losses in 2010. Companies, schools and other organizations can learn how to prepare for fires and other emergencies by becoming a member of the Red Cross Ready Rating™ Program at www.readyrating.org. Complete a free, online assessment of your current readiness level and receive customized feedback with tips to improve preparedness.

In addition to helping families and businesses prepare their homes and facilities for potential fires, the Red Cross is there to help those in need when fires break out. Locally, we are responded to fires every single day throughout our region! In each instance, we work with the family to provide a shoulder to lean-on, help them plan a recovery plan and provide immediate basic needs such as providing a safe place to sleep, food to eat, infant supplies, replace medications, etc.

Throughout October, we are collaborating on several local projects including delivering fire prevention door hangers in Campbellsport, Oakfield and North Fond du Lac on October 27th. This is conjunction with the fire departments and the Gannett newspaper Make a Difference Day project. We will also be at the Fox Valley Technical College Convoy of Hope on October 6th from 10:00a.m. to 4:00p.m. and the Kimberly Clark Employee Safety Fair on October 18th. More events are also in planning stages.

“In order to continue responding to disasters like fires at homes and businesses here in throughout the greater Fox Valley and Michigan border communities, the Red Cross depends on the generous support of individuals and businesses in the community,” added Hansen. “To support our on-going prevention and responses, we ask people to make a financial gift to the Red Cross. We make it easy as you can call 800-RED-CROSS, go to redcross.org or text redcross to 90999 to make a $10 donation.

Help Save Lives with American Red Cross Fire Safety Tips- Install Smoke Alarms and Create a Fire Escape Plan

Red Cross helping out at an apartment fire in Denmark

Every 82 seconds a home fire breaks out, according to the National Fire Protection Agency. Fires can cause irreparable damage to homes and businesses displacing families and employees. Last year, the American Red Cross responded to 63,000 home fires across the country and provided comfort and basic necessities to those affected. This October 9-15 the Red Cross is helping families and businesses learn how to protect themselves and others from fires in observance of National Fire Prevention Week.

“Taking simple steps like installing smoke detectors and developing and practicing a fire escape plan can make a critical difference in saving lives, homes and workplaces,” said Steve Hansen, Regional Chapter Executive, who recommends that every family and business develop and practice a fire safety plan. “Everyone at home, school and work should know what to do when they hear the sound of a smoke alarm.”

Additional recommendations include:

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of the house and inside bedrooms.
  • Replace batteries in smoke alarms at least once a year. Test each alarm monthly by pushing the test button.
  • Ensure that household members know two ways to escape from every room and designate a place to meet outside of your house in case of a fire. Practice your plan at least twice a year.

Follow your escape plan in case of fire. Get out, stay out, and call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number. Visit www.redcross.org/homefires for additional fire safety tips.

Business, too, should be prepared. Fire is the most common of all business disasters. Companies, schools and other organizations can learn how to prepare for fires and other emergencies by becoming a member of the Red Cross Ready Rating™ Program at www.readyrating.org. Complete a free, online assessment of your current readiness level and receive customized feedback with tips to improve preparedness.

In addition to helping families and businesses prepare their homes and facilities for potential fires, the Red Cross is there to help those in need when fires break out. Volunteers from the American Red Cross of Northeast Wisconsin are responding, on average, to a fire every other day in our community.

“In order to continue responding to disasters like fires at homes and businesses here in Northeast Wisconsin, the Red Cross depends on the generous support of individuals and businesses in the community,” added Steve Hansen.

You can help by making a donation to support American Red Cross Disaster Relief. Visit http://www.redcross.org, call 1-800-RED CROSS or text the word REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. Contributions may also be sent to your local American Red Cross chapter or to the American Red Cross, P.O. Box 37243, Washington, DC 20013.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation’s blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

National Fire Prevention Week October 4-10

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Check out these fun & free community activities to teach children about fire prevention safety. For additional children’s activity sheets and interactive games log on to: www.fireprevention.org

Community Fire Prevention Events:

  • Saturday, October 10, 10:00am-1:00pm
De Pere Fire Station, #1
400 Lewis St. De Pere
Open house will have stove top fire extinguisher demonstrations. Children will learn ‘stop, drop, and roll’, ‘crawl low under smoke’, and more. There are games, and tours of the fire station. All fire deparment apparatus and equipment will be on display for the children to look at and ask questions.
  • Saturday, October 10, 10:00am-3:00pm
Howard Fire Department
4165 Shawano Ave, Green Bay, WI 54313
Open house including educational material, tours of the fire station and demonstrations.
  • Monday, October 5, 10:30am
Ashwaubenon Library, 1060 Orlando Dr.
Listen to a story about what firefighters do, then meet a real firefighter who will demonstrate the gear they wear and the equipment they use to put out fires.
  • Wednesday, October 7, 6:30pm
Wrightstown Library, 615 Main St. 
Two village firefighters will talk about fire safety and they are bringing the firetruck!
  • Wednesday, October 14, 10:30am
Pulaski Library, 222 W. Pulaski
Listen to stories about firefighters and firetrucks. Meet a firefighter and see a real firetruck.