Alario Kitchen story (Southern Baptist partnership)

by Tom Breister & Virginia Hart

Dennis Nagan overseeing Kitchen #5. by Tom Breister

As he has done many times before during disasters, American Red Cross volunteer Dennis Nagan from Appleton, Wisconsin, is preparing to transport meals to disaster-affected clients.

Meals are prepared by the Southern Baptist Convention Disaster Relief Kitchen #5 at the Alario Center in Westwego, LA. Food is then stored in large cambros (insulated containers that keep the food piping hot) and American Red Cross workers load them into the back of American Red Cross Emergency Response Vehicles (ERV). ERV’s are then dispatched to different neighborhoods that are desperately in need of hot meals and water. Each ERV can serve over 600 hot meals, plus water and snacks, each time it is dispatched. Depending on need, the ERV’s can service up to 5 routes per day.

ERV drivers are specially trained in Red Cross Chapters across the nation. During a disaster, ERV’s from all over the United States, driven by Red Cross volunteers, mobilize to help feed communities devastated by disaster. The hometown and state of each ERV is imprinted on the side of the vehicle.

Southern Baptist Convention Disaster Relief often partners with the American Red Cross to provide hot meals immediately following a disaster. They are expert in preparing mass amounts of food. Their state of the art food preparation vehicle costs $450,000. Several of these vehicles can be deployed following a major disaster. Southern Baptist manager Jack Sellers said his organization can produce up to 25,000 meals per day at that one kitchen.

Even though he has been deployed as an ERV coordinator in several past disasters, Nagan laughs and says that he always says “but this one is the best.” “The partnership between the Red Cross and the Southern Baptists is critical in delivering services after a disaster,” Nagan said.

Southern Baptist volunteers prepping meals. photo by Mar Tobiason

Fox Cities residents lend a hand in the Gulf

By Jim Collar:  jcollar@postcrescent.com

Disaster workers travel south to provide aid to hurricane victims

Neenah resident Harvey Lorenz arrived at an American Red Cross staging area in East Texas on Thursday ready to assess the damage left in the wake of Hurricane Isaac.

As the weakened and slow-moving storm soaked the Gulf Coast, Lorenz awaited word on when he’d put his training to use.

“I have no idea yet,” Lorenz, 72, said Thursday afternoon.

Lorenz is among 15 Red Cross disaster workers from northeast Wisconsin sent to the Gulf Coast to provide aid for victims of Hurricane Isaac. The hurricane made landfall late Tuesday and has caused significant flooding in coastal areas of Mississippi and Louisiana.

The Red Cross has deployed more than 2,700 trained disaster workers from across the country to offer aid in the Gulf region.

In the Fox Valley, Barbara Pilon of Neenah left for Texas on Wednesday to serve on a team coordinating the distribution of clean-up gear and Kathleen Brockman of Freedom headed to the Gulf Coast to help with health services. Dennis Nagan of Appleton drove the local chapter’s emergency response vehicle south and began distributing food, water and other supplies Thursday.

Barbara Behling, spokeswoman for the American Red Cross in Northeast Wisconsin, expects volunteers will be in the region for quite awhile.

Though Isaac didn’t carry the strength of Katrina seven years ago, Behling said, “this is going to be a long-term recovery effort for many of the people who live in that area.”

The first workers from northeast Wisconsin left for Florida a week ago thinking the Tampa area would suffer the brunt of the storm.

“No one can truly predict what Mother Nature is going to do,” Behling said.

Hurricane Isaac marks the 10th deployment for Lorenz, the Neenah resident who flew into Houston on Wednesday and traveled on Thursday to the Red Cross staging area in Orange, Texas, near the Louisiana border. His first deployment was in response to Hurricane Katrina, after which he worked as a case worker assisting evacuees in Tupelo, Miss.

His latest deployment has been “relatively chaotic,” said Lorenz, who spent Wednesday night on a cot in a church with 110 people. But he is happy to help bring comfort to disaster victims.

“I get a lot out of being able to help somebody,” Lorenz said. “It’s a meaningful experience to see your challenge, be put to use and see the results of the work being done.”

Emergency Response Vehicle Sent to Gulf Coast

By: Kris Schuller:  wearegreenbay.com – Click HERE for video of story.

GREEN BAY, WI (WFRV)  Wisconsin workers and volunteers are already heading south to help with storm damage from Tropical Storm Isaac.

The American Red Cross is busy  preparing  its response to the damage Isaac is expected to bring to the northern gulf coast. Fifteen-hundred disaster workers have been deployed to the area, ten of which are from Northeast Wisconsin. Monday evening – one of those volunteers left Green Bay, on a 16-hour drive to New Orleans.

As Tropical Storm Isaac races  toward the northern gulf coast, slowly growing in intensity, Dennis Nagan prepares for a 1-thousand mile trip, to deliver an emergency response vehicle, for use at  shelters in New Orleans.

“I’m  nervous, excited, got the call this morning, ” said Nagan. “It happened fast and we’re getting ready to go.”

So far Isaac has brought heavy rain, power outages and flooding to Florida. But with storm surges expected to reach 12-feet along the northern gulf coastline, many more may find themselves displaced. The mission of the vehicle is to aid in the distribution of food to disaster victims.

“We can take it to areas affected, so as people clean their homes they can get a little comfort, said Jody Weyers of the Lakeland Chapter of the American Red Cross in Green Bay.

The  emergency response vehicle is one of 150 such vehicles, owned by the National Red Cross and stored at local chapters across the country. With Tropical Storm Isaac expected to intensify in the coming days, a call came in from the national office this afternoon – requesting this vehicle be sent a.s.a.p.

“You are right out in front with people who really need the food, goods and supplies the Red Cross provides and I take it seriously, it’s an honor to do it.” said Nagan.

With 42 shelters currently in operation in Florida and evacuations ordered in low lying areas of Louisiana, the Red Cross expects more shelters will be opening soon. And by early tomorrow Nagan will be in the middle of it all, driving a vehicle which brings hope, by helping feed the hungry.

“Hopefully we won’t be needed, But if so, we’ll be there.”

Depending on the damage suffered, Nagan could be away from his family in Appleton for up to three weeks.