Red Cross Issues Tips to Stay Safe this Summer as Temperatures Rise

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Summer is here, bringing with it dangerous excessive heat. The American Red Cross has steps people can follow to stay safe as the temperatures soar.

carheat

Temperature can rise quickly as high as 19 degrees within 10 minutes.*

NEVER LEAVE CHILDREN, PETS IN THE CAR, the inside temperature of the car can quickly reach 120 degrees. Other heat safety steps include:

  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids. Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.
  • Avoid extreme temperature changes.
  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-colored clothing. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun’s rays.
  • Slow down, stay indoors and avoid strenuous exercise during the hottest part of the day.
  • Postpone outdoor games and activities.
  • Use a buddy system when working in excessive heat. Take frequent breaks if working outdoors.

    carheat1

    Within 20 minutes, the temperature reaches to an unbearable 109 degrees.* (*Graphic Courtesy of General Motors and Golden Gate Weather Services)

  • Check on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning, who spend much of their time alone or who are more likely to be affectedby the heat.
  • Check on animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat. Make sure they have plenty of cool water.
  • If someone doesn’t have air conditioning, they should choose places to go to for relief from the heat during the warmest part of the day (schools, libraries, theaters, malls).

HEAT EXHAUSTION Excessive heat can lead to sunburn, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

If someone is experiencing heat cramps in the legs or abdomen, get them to a cooler place, have them rest, lightly stretch the affected muscle, and replenish their fluids with a half a glass (about 4 ounces) of cool water every 15 minutes.

If someone is exhibiting signs of heat exhaustion (cool, moist, pale or flushed skin, heavy sweating, headache, nausea, dizziness, weakness exhaustion), move them to a cooler place, remove or loosen tight clothing and spray the person with water or apply cool, wet cloths or towels to the skin. Fan the person. If they are conscious, give small amounts of cool water to drink. Make sure the person drinks slowly. Watch for changes in condition. If the person refuses water, vomits or begins to lose consciousness, call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number.

HEAT STROKE IS LIFE-THREATENING. Signs include hot, red skin which may be dry or moist; changes in consciousness; vomiting and high body temperature. Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number immediately if someone shows signs of heat stroke. Move the person to a cooler place. Quickly cool the person’s body by immersing them up to their neck in cold water if possible. Otherwise, douse or spray the person with cold water, or cover the person with cold, wet towels or bags of ice.

For more information on what to do when temperatures rise, people can visit redcross.org, download the Red Cross Heat Wave Safety Checklist, or download the free Red Cross First Aid. The app is available for iPhone and Android smart phone and tablet users in the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store for Android by searching for American Red Cross. People can learn how to treat heat-related and other emergencies by taking First Aid and CPR/AED training online or in person. Go to redcross.org/takeaclass for information and to register.

Year of Death # Fatalities
2000 1
2002 8
2003 9
2004 4
2005 12
2006 10
2007 5
2008 1
2009 8
2010 9
2011 5
2012 24

(From Wisconsin Department of Health Services)

Note: Numbers in table are totals of directly and indirectly-related heat fatalities. If heat was the primary cause of death it is a directly related heat death. If heat was a secondary or contributing cause of death it is an indirectly related heat death.

It is not too late to Give a Gift that Keeps Giving!

Anna Reid, a 15-year-old babysitter from Westfield, NJ wasn’t expecting to be a hero. It just happened. Anna was serving up French bread pizza to Matthew and Leia on a recent babysitting job when the unimaginable happened: Leia started choking.

The 4-year-old’s face turned bright red. Leia tried to cough and speak but couldn’t.

Anna acted quickly, giving Leia five back blows followed by some abdominal thrusts. It worked. Anna saved Leia’s life.

Anna’s mom explained that when she asked Anna how she knew what to do, Anna replied, “I’m not sure I could have told you what to do, but I knew what to do. I knew what to do when I needed to do it.” Anna said because her Red Cross training had her perform CPR in the class, rather than just show it, she immediately remembered how to respond in the moment.

“I have to say that’s really a great testimony to the kind of training that the American Red Cross offers…,” said Anna’s mom.

Leia’s lucky she had a prepared babysitter like Anna. If you were in a situation where someone was choking, would you know what to do? Take our one-minute quiz and find out!

If you want to become a certified babysitter, sign up for a Red Cross class!

Designed for 11 to 15 year olds, the Babysitter’s Training course can help your youngster—

  • Care for children and infants.
  • Be a good leader and role model.
  • Make good decisions and solve problems.
  • Handle emergencies such as injuries, illnesses and household accidents.
  • Write resumes and interview for jobs.
  • And much more!

Throughout the Eastern WI area Babysitter Trainings are being offered on the following dates:

Babysitter Training Courses – $85

Friday, December 28th 8:30 am – 4 pm

American Red Cross Oshkosh Office

Saturday, January 12th 8:30 am – 4 pm

American Red Cross Green Bay office

Saturday, January 12th 8:30 am – 4 pm

American Red Cross Scenic Shores Chapter, Manitowoc

Saturday, January 19th 8:30 am – 4 pm

American Red Cross Outagamie Chapter

Visit www.redcross.org or call 1-800-RED-CROSS to register today.

American Red Cross Tips Help Kids Stay Safe When Home Alone

Develop and Practice Plan to Ensure Safety after School

As children around the nation are returning to school, many of them will be spending time home alone after school until their parents get home from work.

The American Red Cross has steps parents and children can take to make these after-school hours safer and less stressful.

 First decide if your child is mature enough to be home alone and ask him or her if they would be comfortable being alone. Parents and guardians should develop a home safety plan and discuss it and practice it with their children. After-school child care, programs at schools and youth clubs, or youth sports programs are alternatives for children who are not mature enough or uncomfortable staying home alone.

The Red Cross recommends that parents and guardians take the following steps if a child will be home alone after school.

If the child is going to go home after school, it’s a good idea to have them call to check in when they get home. For an older child, set ground rules about whether other kids can come over when the parents are absent, whether cooking is an option, whether they can leave the home.

Other steps that parents and guardians can include in their home safety plans: 

  • Post an emergency phone list where the children can see it. Include 9-1-1, the parents work and cell numbers, numbers for neighbors, and the numbers for anyone else who is close and trusted.
  • Identify neighbors whose home your child can go to in case of an emergency that requires your child to leave your home.
  • Practice an emergency plan with the child so they know what to do in case of fire, injury, or other emergencies. Write the plan down and make sure the child knows where it is.
  • Make sure the first aid kit is stocked and stored where your children can find it; keep it out of reach of young children.
  • Let children know where the flashlights are. Make sure that the batteries are fresh, and that the child knows how to use them.
  • Remove or safely store in locked areas dangerous items like guns, ammunition, knives, hand tools, power tools, razor blades, scissors, and other objects that can cause injury.
  • Make sure potential poisons like detergents, polishes, pesticides, care-care fluids, lighter fluid and lamp oils are stored in locked cabinets or out of the reach of children.
  • Make sure medicine is kept in a locked storage place or out of the reach of children.
  • Install safety covers on all unused electrical outlets.
  • Limit any cooking a young child can do. Make sure at least one approved smoke alarm is installed and operating on each level of the home.
  • Limit the time the child spends in front of the television or computer. Activate parental controls. Use programs that limit the sites children can visit, restrict chat sites and allow parents to monitor online activity. 

Safety Steps for Children 

When talking to kids about being at home alone, parents should stress the following steps, and post them somewhere to remind the child about what they should, or shouldn’t, do until mom, dad or caregiver get home: 

    • Lock the door and make sure all the windows are closed and locked.
    • If the home has an electronic security system, children should learn how to turn it on and have it on when home alone.
    • Never open the door to strangers. Always check before opening the door to anyone, looking out through a peephole or window first. Only open the door for people that parents and guardians have given you permission to let in the house. If unsure, contact your caregiver.
    • Never open the door to delivery people or service representatives. Ask delivery people to leave the package at the door or tell them to come back at another time. Service representatives, such as a TV cable installer, should have an appointment when an adult is home.
    • Never tell someone on the telephone that the parents are not at home. Say something like “He or she is busy right now. Can I take a message?”
    • Do not talk about being home alone on public websites. Kids should be cautious about sharing information about their location when using chat rooms or posting on social networks.
    • Never leave the house without permission. If it’s okay to go outside, children should contact their parents and tell them where they are going, when they are leaving, and when they will return. If mom and dad are still at work, children should call them when they leave and when they return home.
    • Do not go outside to check out an unusual noise. If the noise worries the child, they should call their parents, an adult, or the police.
    • Don’t talk to strangers.
    • Do not have friends over to visit when your parents aren’t at home. Do not let anyone inside who is using drugs or alcohol, even if you know them.
    • If the child smells smoke or hears a fire or smoke alarm, they should get outside and ask a neighbor to call the fire department. 

Consider Babysitter’s Training for Youth Taking Care of Others

Many tweens and teens are responsible for watching younger siblings. The Red Cross Babysitter’s Training course provides 11 to 15 year-olds with the knowledge and skills necessary to safely and responsibly provide care for children and infants. Participants learn basic child care and first aid, develop leadership skills and learn how to develop a babysitting business. Contact any of the local Red Cross offices or visit www.redcross.org/babysitting for more information. 

 About the American Red Cross: 

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation’s blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

 

American Red Cross Commits $2.7 Million to Help 3,000 Haitian Children Return to School

Contact: Julie Sell
Spokesperson, – Haiti Delegation
American Red Cross
sellj@usa.redcross.org
Phone: (509) 3488-5864

WASHINGTON, Tuesday, February 15, 2011 — The American Red Cross today announced it was spending $2.7 million to provide financial support for Haitian families affected by the January 2010 earthquake so their children can attend school.

An estimated 3,000 children in the Port-au-Prince neighborhood of Croix Deprez, a hilly area where many homes collapsed in the earthquake, are benefiting. The program, which targets children and youth ages five through 19, provides vouchers to cover the cost of school fees. In addition, participating families will receive a cash grant of $100 per child to cover the cost of school-related expenses, including transportation, uniforms and lunch.

“This is a terrific program,” said Matthew Marek, head of programs for the American Red Cross in Haiti. “Children get an education, and cash-strapped families can use their savings for other pressing needs.”

The program pays students’ school fees for the remainder of the current academic year. To be eligible for the school vouchers and cash grants, families must live in one of three camps in the Croix Deprez area, and have enrolled their children in primary or secondary school by a January 2011 deadline set by the Haitian government.

Nearly 200 area schools are participating in the program. Many of them lost a large number of fee-paying students after the earthquake because families could no longer afford to send their children to school. Now, thanks to the American Red Cross funding, they have the income to pay teachers and staff. The program is being implemented with approval from the Haitian Ministry of Education.

Haiti has one of the lowest literacy rates in the world. One challenge for families is the lack of funds to pay for private schools, which make up the bulk of the Haitian education system.  In many cases, school fees exceed $140 per trimester per child. Prior to the earthquake, which left more than 230,000 dead and left more than 1.3 million homeless, more than two-thirds of the Haitian population lived on less than $2 a day.

The American Red Cross has long supported school-based initiatives in the U.S .and around the world. For decades, the organization has worked with and in schools on issues including disaster preparedness, health and safety education, food assistance and psychosocial support.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation’s blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

Learn to be the best babysitter: Fox 11 Good Day WI Segment

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE VIDEO:

The American Red Cross has revised its babysitting course to include hands-on activities, exciting videos, role-playing and discussion groups.

Course participants will learn how to:

* Supervise children and infants
* Perform basic child care skills such as diapering and feeding
* Choose safe, age-appropriate games and toys
* Handle bedtime and discipline issues
* Identify safety hazards and prevent injuries
* Care for common injuries and emergencies such as choking, burns, cuts and bee stings
* Communicate effectively with parents

To find a course near you call your local Red Cross or log onto: www.newredcross.org