Join us for the 100 Days of Summer!

redcross_100daysSummer is the season we’ve all been waiting for. It’s 100 days of high dives, ball games and barbecues. It’s 100 ways to dress a burger, catch some shade, or get out of town. It’s 100 chances to clear the calendar, and choose your day to give. As your summer calendar fills up, consider making time to donate blood or platelets with the Red Cross!

The Red Cross is clearing its calendar for what’’s most important – saving lives! We invite you to join us as we count down the 100 chances to give hope this summer, between Memorial Day and Labor Day. Click here to read amazing stories, participate in promotional giveaways and stay inspired all summer long! And be sure to stay connected on social media with #ChooseYourDay.

Please click here to schedule your appointment to donate and save up to 3 lives.

Unable to donate? Click here to volunteer.

 

My Experience with Youth Volunteering

By: PaKou Lee, Red Cross PR/Social Media Volunteer

“A leader is one who knows the way, goes the way, and shows the way.”

Youth volunteering reinforces a feeling of involvement, belonging and acceptance in their community. Youth volunteers also have a tendency to do better in school and have a lesser chance by 50% of engaging in risky and unhealthy behaviors  by volunteering once a week. They gain new life skills, important work ethics, and meet different types of people.

Volunteering is important for me because I enjoy the feeling of giving back to the community. I get to meet great people with amazing backgrounds and learn so much from them. I also come from a huge Hmong family and as an aunt to more than 28 nieces and nephews I do my best to be a great role model for them. I have accomplished the typical expectations: go to school, get good grades, graduate college, and not be married by the age of 18. Although I don’t get to see many of my nieces and nephews, I still want to show them that there are better things in life than just video games and having good grades.

So when the Packer 5K was coming up on July 27th, I knew it’d be the perfect opportunity to bring two of my nieces, Nevaeh, 10 and Cienna, 6 along. The night before the race I explained to them that we were going to pass out water and Gatorade to the runners. The next morning, Cienna was ready by 9a.m. and eager to leave.  I was impressed with her enthusiasm but we didn’t have to leave the house until 5p.m.

When we were setting up the Gatorade station with other Red Cross volunteers, Cienna asked me, “Auntie PaKou, what does volunteer mean?” I was surprised by her question because I thought I had explained to her what we were doing. Then I realized I only told her what we were doing, not the meaning of the word and why we were doing it. I answered her, “Volunteering is about helping people for free and not asking for something back like what we are doing right now. We are going to pass out the Gatorade to the runners.” It was great to see Nevaeh and Cienna excited for the runners. We worked great as a team.

At the end, Nevaeh and I had a friendly “argument” about who passed out more Gatorade. To this day, she still thinks she passed out more than me. The only things that mattered to me were they both had fun, they gave back to the community, and wanted to come back next year to volunteer again.

American Red Cross has many volunteer opportunities for youth from starting a Red Cross club at school to activity guides to spread the Red Cross mission. Click here for more information.

Thanks to the Red Cross for the opportunity. Cienna (L) and Nevaeh (R) look forward to more volunteering!

American Red Cross Offers Discount on Babysitting Courses

Area Youth Can Learn How to Handle Emergencies and Build a Business


Don’t be that type of babysitter from the video. Take one of our Red Cross babysitting courses and learn all of the right skills and safety techniques. Get on your way to earning money this summer.

The American Red Cross is offering a 20 percent discount on babysitting course registrations through the end of July.

Three Red Cross babysitting course options are available for 11- to 15-year-olds. The Babysitter’s Basics online course, Babysitter’s Training classroom course and an extended classroom course with Pediatric First Aid/CPR are all eligible for the discount using coupon code INDY200913 (case sensitive) when registering online at redcross.org/takeaclass or by calling 1-800-REDCROSS. All registrations made through July 31 are eligible for the discount regardless of when the course takes place.

Babysitter’s Training classroom courses are scheduled from 8:30a.m. – 4:00p.m and are the local American Red Cross offices.

July 24, Oshkosh, WI

July 29, Green Bay, WI

July 30, Appleton, WI

August 3, Oshkosh, WI

August 3, Green Bay, WI

August 22, Iron Mountain, MI

August 24, Green Bay, WI

“All of the course options provide students with a range of training and skills so they can jump start their babysitting career and show potential employers they know their stuff,” said Sara Weier, Preparedness, Health & Safety Manager. “Participants learn to keep themselves and the children they are responsible for safe, including how to handle situations that sitters are likely to encounter such as treating bleeding, bee stings, and burns.”

America’s youth have been learning how to be responsible babysitters by taking American Red Cross training for more than 35 years.

The format of the Babysitting Basics online course allows future sitters to learn at anytime and to go through the content at their own pace. Classroom course participants have hands-on skills practice and receive feedback from expert Red Cross instructors. Youth who complete the extended course received a 2-year certification in Pediatric First Aid/CPR. Additional course information is available at redcross.org/babysitting.

“Parents and guardians want to entrust their children to a babysitter who is trained in childcare skills, First Aid and CPR,” added Weier “Trained and responsible sitters are an invaluable resource.”

Red Cross Issues Tips to Stay Safe this Summer as Temperatures Rise

Image

Summer is here, bringing with it dangerous excessive heat. The American Red Cross has steps people can follow to stay safe as the temperatures soar.

carheat

Temperature can rise quickly as high as 19 degrees within 10 minutes.*

NEVER LEAVE CHILDREN, PETS IN THE CAR, the inside temperature of the car can quickly reach 120 degrees. Other heat safety steps include:

  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids. Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.
  • Avoid extreme temperature changes.
  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-colored clothing. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun’s rays.
  • Slow down, stay indoors and avoid strenuous exercise during the hottest part of the day.
  • Postpone outdoor games and activities.
  • Use a buddy system when working in excessive heat. Take frequent breaks if working outdoors.

    carheat1

    Within 20 minutes, the temperature reaches to an unbearable 109 degrees.* (*Graphic Courtesy of General Motors and Golden Gate Weather Services)

  • Check on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning, who spend much of their time alone or who are more likely to be affectedby the heat.
  • Check on animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat. Make sure they have plenty of cool water.
  • If someone doesn’t have air conditioning, they should choose places to go to for relief from the heat during the warmest part of the day (schools, libraries, theaters, malls).

HEAT EXHAUSTION Excessive heat can lead to sunburn, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

If someone is experiencing heat cramps in the legs or abdomen, get them to a cooler place, have them rest, lightly stretch the affected muscle, and replenish their fluids with a half a glass (about 4 ounces) of cool water every 15 minutes.

If someone is exhibiting signs of heat exhaustion (cool, moist, pale or flushed skin, heavy sweating, headache, nausea, dizziness, weakness exhaustion), move them to a cooler place, remove or loosen tight clothing and spray the person with water or apply cool, wet cloths or towels to the skin. Fan the person. If they are conscious, give small amounts of cool water to drink. Make sure the person drinks slowly. Watch for changes in condition. If the person refuses water, vomits or begins to lose consciousness, call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number.

HEAT STROKE IS LIFE-THREATENING. Signs include hot, red skin which may be dry or moist; changes in consciousness; vomiting and high body temperature. Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number immediately if someone shows signs of heat stroke. Move the person to a cooler place. Quickly cool the person’s body by immersing them up to their neck in cold water if possible. Otherwise, douse or spray the person with cold water, or cover the person with cold, wet towels or bags of ice.

For more information on what to do when temperatures rise, people can visit redcross.org, download the Red Cross Heat Wave Safety Checklist, or download the free Red Cross First Aid. The app is available for iPhone and Android smart phone and tablet users in the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store for Android by searching for American Red Cross. People can learn how to treat heat-related and other emergencies by taking First Aid and CPR/AED training online or in person. Go to redcross.org/takeaclass for information and to register.

Year of Death # Fatalities
2000 1
2002 8
2003 9
2004 4
2005 12
2006 10
2007 5
2008 1
2009 8
2010 9
2011 5
2012 24

(From Wisconsin Department of Health Services)

Note: Numbers in table are totals of directly and indirectly-related heat fatalities. If heat was the primary cause of death it is a directly related heat death. If heat was a secondary or contributing cause of death it is an indirectly related heat death.