Blood Donations Urgently Needed

 

Suzi Hass, giving her 5th Gallon at the Northern Door YMCA Blood Drive.

Severe winter weather has forced the cancellation of 23,000 Red Cross blood and platelet donations since January 1.  More than 2,600 Mid-America Blood Services Division donations, serving 330 hospitals in the Midwest and parts of the central United States, are among the cancellations. 

All blood is needed, especially types O negative, A negative, and B negative.  Donations will be used first to meet any shortages at local hospitals.  Any remaining supplies will be moved through the Red Cross national network to where they are most needed.

The Red Cross asks all eligible donors to please make an appointment to give blood or platelets as soon as safely possible.  Your donations will help save lives. 

For a schedule of February donations click here.  For more information call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org.

Soup’s On raises $35,000 for local Red Cross services

Soup’s On, the signature fundraising event for the American Red Cross-Outagamie Chapter, raised nearly $35,000 for local services.

The 17th annual Soup’s On was held Jan. 20th at the Grand Meridian in Appleton. The funds raised through ticket sales, silent auction, raffles and corporate sponsorships support a variety of local Red Cross services, including disaster relief, services to the Armed Forces, shopping and errand services for homebound older adults and disabled individuals and life-saving health and safety education and training.

“Raising $35,000 in our challenging economic environment is a huge success,” said Chapter Executive Director Tony Gonzalez. “We really appreciate everyone who came out to help us raise funds to assist over 10,000 people who receive chapter services every year.”

Gonzalez also thanked the event volunteers, the restaurants who donated food and other food items for the event and local businesses who purchased sponsorships or donated items for the silent auction. “Everyone working together made this event a huge success,” he said.

For more information, please visit www.redcrossoutagamie.org or call 920-733-4481.

American Red Cross Responds to Massive Winter Storm

Shelters open; blood donors still needed

The American Red Cross is on the ground in 19 states, offering food, comfort and a safe place to stay to people affected by the massive winter storm which has buried the country in ice and snow from the Rocky Mountains to Maine.

As of midnight last night, 73 shelters were open in nine states with additional shelters on standby as the storm system moves to the Northeast. To find an open Red Cross shelter, people can visit www.redcross.org and click on ‘Find a Shelter,’ or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). People can also contact their emergency management office for help locating a shelter.

In Chicago alone, more than 360 people spent the night in Red Cross shelters. Many were motorists stranded by the storm. In Tulsa, Red Cross disaster workers housed almost 70 people overnight who could not make it home due to the storm. Five Red Cross disaster warehouses are on alert, ready to ship supplies to where they are needed to help people in the path of this huge winter storm.

To help people affected by this winter storm and thousands of disasters in this country and around the world, visit www.redcross.org, call 1-800-RED CROSS, or text the word REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. Contributions may also be sent to someone’s local Red Cross chapter, or to the American Red Cross, P.O. Box 37243, Washington, DC 20013.

Blood Donors Still Needed

The number of blood donations gone uncollected due to winter storms rose to nearly 23,000 overnight, with more blood drive cancellations expected as the storm moves toward New England. The Red Cross urges people who are eligible to schedule an appointment to give blood now.

People can schedule their donation by calling 1-800-RED CROSS or visiting www.redcrossblood.org. All blood types are needed, but there is a special need for donors with O-Negative, A-Negative and B-Negative blood. To give blood, someone must be 17 years of age or older (16 with parental permission in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and be in generally good health. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.  Individuals should bring their Red Cross blood donor card or other form of positive ID when coming to donate.

Winter Storm Safety Tips

If someone has to leave home and go to a shelter, they should remember to bring prescription and emergency medications, extra clothing, pillows, blankets, toiletries, important documents and other comfort items. They should remember items needed for infants and children, such as diapers, formula, and toys, along with any special things for family members who are elderly or disabled.

If possible, people should stay inside and avoid unnecessary travel. The Red Cross offers these steps people can take to stay safe and warm:

  • Do not use stoves or ovens to heat the home.
  • Place space heaters on a hard, level, nonflammable surface.  Do not put space heaters on rugs or carpets, near bedding or drapes, and keep children and pets away. 
  • Turn off space heaters or extinguish the fireplace before going to bed or leaving home. 
  • Keep all flammable materials such as newspapers, matches, bedding, clothing, carpets and rugs at least three feet away from heat sources such as space heaters, fireplaces and stoves.

If someone must go outside, they should wear layered lightweight clothing to stay warm. Gloves (or mittens) and a hat will prevent loss of body heat. Covering the mouth will protect the lungs. Other safety tips include:

  • Wear waterproof, insulated boots to keep feet warm and dry and to maintain footing in ice and snow.
    • If shoveling snow, take frequent breaks and stay hydrated. Avoid overexertion.
    • Avoid traveling by car in a storm, but if someone must be out on the roads …
      • Carry a Disaster Supplies Kit in the trunk.
      • Keep the car’s gas tank full for emergency use and to keep the fuel line from freezing.
      • The traveler should let someone know where they are going, the route being taken and expected arrival time. If their vehicle gets stuck along the way, help can be sent along the predetermined route.

 For more information on how to stay safe and warm during this latest onslaught of winter, visit www.redcross.org.     

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation’s blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

You can help people affected by disasters like winter storms, as well as countless crises at home and around the world, by making a donation to support American Red Cross Disaster Relief. Your gift enables the Red Cross to prepare for and provide shelter, food, emotional support and other assistance in response to disasters. Visit http://www.redcross.org or call 1-800-RED-CROSS. Contributions may also be sent to your local American Red Cross chapter or to the American Red Cross, P.O. Box 37243, Washington, DC 20013.

Red Cross Helps Three Displaced by Fire in Downtown Green Bay

The American Red Cross Lakeland Chapter responded to house fire on Cherry St. in Green Bay around 7:30am, on February 2. Two American Red Cross disaster workers assisted the three adults displaced by the fire with their immediate emergency needs.

We provided the clients with hotel stay, monetary assistance for clothing and food.

We also provided all clients with comfort kits (which include soap, shampoo, toothbrush, toothpaste, washcloth, comb, facial tissue, deodorant, razors, shaving cream and lotion) and homemade quilts.

Red Cross disaster assistance is free and is made possible by community donations. You can help individuals of this disaster and others by making a financial gift to the American Red Cross Lakeland Chapter for local disaster relief. For information call the Lakeland Chapter at 920-468-8535 or visit www.arclakeland.org.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation’s blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

Blizzard!

Posted on February 1st, 2011 by Wendy Harman, American Red Cross

This weather.com map shows the extent of today’s massive blizzard across the country.

We hope you’ve brushed up on our winter weather tips. Don’t forget to check in on your neighbors!

If you use Twitter, be sure to follow the #blizzard hashtag for news and updates and to use the #Imprepared hashtag to share how you got ready for this storm.  You can also find out what local chapters are up to by following this local Red Cross Twitter list.

Celebrate Diversity by Donating Blood

During Black History Month, the American Red Cross celebrates the significant contributions African-Americans make to helping the Red Cross maintain a diverse and stable blood supply for patients across the United States.  Today’s Red Cross blood program is the result of the efforts of Dr. Charles Drew, an African-American blood specialist, surgeon, educator and scientist. In 1941, Dr. Drew became the first medical director of the first American Red Cross blood bank. His pioneering work in blood collection and transfusion laid the foundationfor modern blood banking.
 

“The Red Cross strives to maintain a blood supply as diverse as the U.S. population,” said Greg Novinska, CEO of the Badger Hawkeye Blood Services region. “While African-Americans comprise nearly 13 percent of the United States population, they represent less than 1 percent of blood donors.”

Help the Red Cross celebrate the contributions of Dr. Drew and make an appointment to donate blood in his honor. The blood you give today can make a difference in the lives of patients in your community and throughout the nation.

American Red Cross Urges Preparedness As Damaging Winter Storm Threatens About 100 Million People

Blood donors needed as winter weather continues to affect supply

The American Red Cross is preparing to respond to the destructive winter storm that is bearing down on the country from just east of the Rocky Mountains to the coast of New England. The storm could impact a third of the population of the United States, and it threatens to bring blizzard conditions and heavy ice and snow.

This latest winter blast could further impact the Red Cross blood supply which has already seen more than 18,000 expected blood donations go uncollected over the last several weeks due to bad winter weather. People are asked to make an appointment to give blood by calling 1-800-RED CROSS or visiting www.redcrossblood.org. Those who live in the path of the storm are asked to schedule a donation time when it is safe to travel. All blood types are needed, but there is a special need for donors with O-Negative, A-Negative and B-Negative blood.

People have been responding to the call for blood donors, and the Red Cross is grateful to those who are stepping up to donate blood to help build the blood supply back to where it should be. The Red Cross distributes blood products to approximately 3,000 hospitals and transfusion centers across the United States.

“We are grateful for the upswing in donations which has occurred since we issued the call for people to give blood,” said Richard Benjamin, Chief Medical Officer, American Red Cross. “However, this latest storm is expected to further impact our ability to hold blood collections. We continue to need the public’s help to rebuild our blood inventory back to a safe and adequate level.”

Red Cross chapters all across the country are preparing to respond to the storm as needed. The Red Cross is working with state and local government officials and calling disaster workers, getting them ready to respond if necessary.

Weather experts are predicting the storm could affect about 100 million people. Heavy snow will make travel impossible at times, with snow drifting as high as eight feet in some locations. Some areas will experience a crippling amount of ice which could lead to power outages for hundreds of thousands of customers. Dangerously cold air could give way to wind chills reading below zero. Southern states will not escape the storm’s fury, as severe thunderstorms are predicted to sweep across the region, accompanied by damaging winds.

If possible, people should stay inside and avoid unnecessary travel. The Red Cross offers these steps people can take to stay safe and warm:

  • Do not use stoves or ovens to heat the home.
  • Place space heaters on a hard, level, nonflammable surface.  Do not put space heaters on rugs or carpets, near bedding or drapes, and keep children and pets away. 
  • Turn off space heaters or extinguish the fireplace before going to bed or leaving home. 
  • Keep all flammable materials such as newspapers, matches, bedding, clothing, carpets and rugs at least three feet away from heat sources such as space heaters, fireplaces and stoves.

 If someone must go outside, they should wear layered lightweight clothing to stay warm. Gloves (or mittens) and a hat will prevent loss of body heat. Covering the mouth will protect the lungs. Other safety tips include:

  • Wear waterproof, insulated boots to keep feet warm and dry and to maintain footing in ice and snow.
    • If shoveling snow, take frequent breaks and stay hydrated. Avoid overexertion.
    • Avoid traveling by car in a storm, but if someone must be out on the roads …
      • Carry a Disaster Supplies Kit in the trunk.
      • Keep the car’s gas tank full for emergency use and to keep the fuel line from freezing.
      • The traveler should let someone know where they are going, the route being taken and expected arrival time. If their vehicle gets stuck along the way, help can be sent along the predetermined route.

 For more information on how to stay safe and warm during this latest onslaught of winter, visit www.redcross.org.       

 About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation’s blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.